Visit Zion National Park, Utah with Mighway

Rent an RV in Zion National Park


Zion National Park is located in the Southwestern United States, near Springdale, Utah. A prominent feature of the 229-square-mile (590 km2) park is Zion Canyon, which is 15 miles (24 km) long and up to half a mile (800 m) deep, cut through the reddish and tan-colored Navajo Sandstone by the North Fork of the Virgin River. The lowest elevation is 3,666 ft (1,117 m) at Coalpits Wash and the highest elevation is 8,726 ft (2,660 m) at Horse Ranch Mountain. Located at the junction of the Colorado Plateau, Great Basin, and Mojave Desert regions, the park's unique geography and variety of life zones allow for unusual plant and animal diversity. Numerous plant species as well as 289 species of birds, 75 mammals (including 19 species of bat), and 32 reptiles inhabit the park's four life zones: desert, riparian, woodland, and coniferous forest. Zion National Park includes mountains, canyons, buttes, mesas, monoliths, rivers, slot canyons, and natural arches. Human habitation of the area started about 8,000 years ago with small family groups of Native Americans; the semi-nomadic Basketmaker Anasazi (300 CE) stem from one of these groups. In turn, the Virgin Anasazi culture (500 CE) developed as the Basketmakers settled in permanent communities. A different group, the Parowan Fremont, lived in the area as well. Both groups moved away by 1300 and were replaced by the Parrusits and several other Southern Paiute subtribes. Mormons came into the area in 1858 and settled there in the early 1860s. In 1909 the President of the United States, William Howard Taft, named the area a National Monument to protect the canyon, under the name of Mukuntuweap National Monument. In 1918, however, the acting director of the newly created National Park Service changed the park's name to Zion, the name used by the Mormons. According to historian Hal Rothman: "The name change played to a prevalent bias of the time. Many believed that Spanish and Indian names would deter visitors who, if they could not pronounce the name of a place, might not bother to visit it. The new name, Zion, had greater appeal to an ethnocentric audience." The United States Congress established the monument as a National Park on November 19, 1919. The Kolob section was proclaimed a separate Zion National Monument in 1937, but was incorporated into the park in 1956. The geology of the Zion and Kolob canyons area includes nine formations that together represent 150 million years of mostly Mesozoic-aged sedimentation. At various periods in that time warm, shallow seas, streams, ponds and lakes, vast deserts, and dry near-shore environments covered the area. Uplift associated with the creation of the Colorado Plateaus lifted the region 10,000 feet (3,000 m) starting 13 million years ago.

RV Rental Zion National Park


Cabover Style C22 RV - UTAH
Vehicle Price from
$70 / Night

Cabover Style C22 RV - UTAH

Joseph, Utah

Sleeps 5 Toilet Shower

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Cabover Style C22 RV - UTAH V4
Vehicle Price from
$70 / Night

Cabover Style C22 RV - UTAH V4

Joseph, Utah

Sleeps 5 Toilet Shower

More info >

Places to Visit near Zion National Park


Bryce Canyon National Park

There is no place quite like Bryce Canyon. Hoodoos (odd-shaped pillars of rock left standing from the forces of erosion) can be found on every continent, but here is the archetypal "hoodoo-iferous" terrain. Descriptions fail. Cave without a roof? Forest of stone? Even photographs strain credulity. When you visit maybe you'll come up with a better name. In the meantime "Bryce" will have to suffice. At Bryce Canyon, hoodoos range in size from that of an average human to heights exceeding a 10-story building. Formed in sedimentary rock, hoodoo shapes are affected by the erosional patterns of alternating hard and softer rock layers. The name given to the rock layer that forms hoodoos at Bryce Canyon is the Claron Formation. This layer has several rock types including siltstones and mudstones but is predominatly limestone. Thirty to 40 million years ago this rock was "born" in an ancient lake that covered much of Western Utah. Minerals deposited within different rock types cause hoodoos to have different colors throughout their height. Bryce Canyon is a small national park in southwestern Utah. Named after the Mormon Pioneer Ebenezer Bryce, Bryce Canyon became a national park in 1928. Hoodoos are tall skinny spires of rock that protrude from the bottom of arid basins and "broken" lands. Hoodoos are most commonly found in the High Plateaus region of the Colorado Plateau and in the Badlands regions of the Northern Great Plains. While hoodoos are scattered throughout these areas, nowhere in the world are they as abundant as in the northern section of Bryce Canyon National Park. In common usage, the difference between Hoodoos and pinnacles or spires is that hoodoos have a variable thickness often described as having a "totem pole-shaped body." A spire, on the other hand, has a smoother profile or uniform thickness that tapers from the ground upward. Bryce Canyon, famous for its worldly unique geology, consists of a series of horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters carved from the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau. The erosional force of frost-wedging and the dissolving power of rainwater have shaped the colorful limestone rock of the Claron Formation into bizarre shapes, including slot canyons, windows, fins, and spires called "hoodoos". Ponderosa pines, high elevation meadows, and fir-spruce forests border the rim of the plateau and abound with wildlife. This area boasts some of the world's best air quality, offering panoramic views of three states and approaching 200 miles of visibility. This, coupled with the lack of nearby large light sources, creates unparalleled opportunities for stargazing. Spend a week or spend a few hours. Bryce Canyon National Park offers something special for all ages of every interest.  Common Names: Hoodoo, goblin Size Range: 5-150 ft. tall (1.5-45 m) Formation Name: Claron Limestone Rock Age: Paleocene or Eocene in age, 40-60 mya Famous Examples: Thor's Hammer, The Hunter, Queen Victoria

Temple Square

Temple Square, located in beautiful downtown Salt Lake City, has all the services needed for a wonderful visit. Amazing restaurants, exquisite gardens and interesting historical sites are found on the thirty-five acre site. Four restaurants include The Roof (award winning buffet), The Garden (with a retractable roof), the Lion House Pantry (Cafeteria style dining in the Historic Home of Brigham Young) and the Nauvoo Café (fast and convenient and good) to fit every taste and budget. There are also beautifully appointed banquet rooms for weddings and special occasions. Free tours of Temple Square and most of the attractions are available.Guided tours and presentations feature historic sites, interactive exhibits, art displays, 70-mm films, parks and gardens. Also featured are the largest genealogy library of its kind in the world and the renowned Mormon Tabernacle Choir and Orchestra at Temple Square. Enjoy all of this in the heart of downtown Salt Lake City. Tours are available in more than 40 languages at some locations at no charge to you. Restaurants and catering facilities are available to help enhance your visit as well. Whether you are visiting for the first time or coming back to enjoy Temple Square again we welcome you!

Dead Horse Point State Park

From the prominence of Dead Horse Point, 2,000 feet above a gooseneck in the Colorado River, an ever changing landscape unfurls. Immense vertical cliffs meet with canyons carved by ice, water and wind creating a visual masterpiece. Plants and animals surviving on the edge of existence face many challenges of extreme conditions within this high desert environment. Stories of ancient hunters, resting along the cliff tops while knapping chert in preparation for the next hunt, and cowboys of the late 1800’s, chasing wild mustangs onto Dead Horse Point, using the narrow neck to block off the natural corral. What story will you discover on your visit to Dead Horse Point State Park?

Angel's Landing

(5.4 mile / 8.7 km round-trip). Trailhead is at the Grotto. A steep, strenuous hike up the West Rim Trail to the Angels Landing Trail, which is a half mile / 0.8 km spur. The trail follows a steep, narrow ridge with chains added to provide handholds. This spectacular trail ends at a magnificent overlook of Zion Canyon and the Virgin River. For those in good physical condition and not afraid of heights, this hike is a must. Those afraid of heights can stop and turn around at '''Scout Overlook''' where the final vertiginous ascent to Angel's landing starts. The hike to Scout Overlook only is strenuous but less exposed.

Campgrounds and RV Parks near Zion National Park


Devil's Garden

wonderland of geological oddities

The Devils Garden of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (GSENM) in south central Utah, the United States, is a protected area featuring hoodoos, natural arches and other sandstone formations. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) designated the name Devils Gardenwithout an apostrophe according to USGS naming conventionson December 31, 1979. The area is also known as the Devils Garden Outstanding Natural Area within the National Landscape Conservation System. The formations in the Devils Garden were created, and continue to be shaped, by various weathering and erosional processes. These natural processes have been shaping sandstone layers formed more than 166 million years ago during the Jurassic period's Middle epoch. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) administers the Devils Garden and the entire GSENM which is the first National Monument assigned to the BLM.

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Snow Canyon State Park

the remains of an ancient desert sand sea

Discover the majestic beauty of Snow Canyon State Park, just nine miles north of St. George along highway 18. Notorious for its unique geological features, Snow Canyon State Park is comprised of volcanic cones, sand dunes, deep red sandstone cliffs, and twisted layers of rock. The scenery is so spectacular it has been the backdrop for Hollywood movies including The Electric Horseman and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid! Campsites cost $16 for tents, $20 for RVs. Pets are allowed if kept on a leash in the campground and on West Canyon Road and Whiptail Trail only. Opened to the public as a Utah State Park in 1962. Snow Canyon State Park is a 7,400-acre scenic park quietly tucked amid lava flows and soaring sandstone cliffs in a strikingly colorful and fragile desert environment. Majestic views and the subtle interplay of light, shadow, and color dancing across canyon walls evoke strong emotional responses from visitors. Located in the 62,000 acre Red Cliffs Desert Reserve, established to protect the federally listed desert tortoise and its habitat, the park offers opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts of all ages. Activities include hiking, nature studies, wildlife viewing, photography, camping, ranger talks, and junior ranger programs. There are more than 38 miles of hiking trails, a three-mile paved walking/biking trail, and over 15 miles of equestrian trails. Park History Created in 1959, Snow Canyon has a long history of human use. Anasazi Indians inhabited the region from A.D. 200 to 1250, utilizing the canyon for hunting and gathering. Paiute Indians used the canyon from A.D. 1200 to the mid-1800s. Mormon pioneers discovered Snow Canyon in the 1850’s while searching for lost cattle. Modern-day the canyon has been the site of Hollywood films such as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Electric Horseman, and Jeremiah Johnson. Originally called Dixie State Park, it was later renamed for Lorenzo and Erastus Snow, prominent pioneering Utah leaders. Geology Transported by wind more than 183 million years ago, tiny grains of quartzite sand covered much of what we now call Utah. These sand dunes, up to 2,500 feet thick, eventually were cemented into stone. Burnt orange to creamy white in color, Navajo sandstone, the predominant rock in the park, is what remains of the ancient desert sand sea. Over time, water has cut and shaped the sandstone to form canyons. Approximately 1.4 million years ago, and as recently as 27,000 years ago, nearby cinder cones erupted, causing lava to flow down these canyons, filling them with basalt. This redirected ancient waterways, eventually carving new canyons. Look up from within the park to see lava-capped ridges that were once canyon bottoms. Removal of rocks and minerals is prohibited.

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