Visit Wasatch Front, Utah with Mighway

Rent an RV in Wasatch Front


The Wasatch Front /ˈwɑːsætʃ/ is a metropolitan region in the north-central part of the U.S. state of Utah. It consists of a chain of contiguous cities and towns stretched along the Wasatch Range from approximately Nephi in the south to Brigham City in the north. Roughly 80% of Utah's population resides in this region, which contains the major cities of Salt Lake City, Provo, West Valley City, West Jordan, Layton, and Ogden.

RV Rental Wasatch Front


2010 Roadtrek 210 - Popular
Vehicle Price from
$189 / Night

2010 Roadtrek 210 - Popular

Millcreek, Utah

3 22ft

2600lbs Sleeps 4 Tow it with a small suv
Vehicle Price from
$79 / Night

2600lbs Sleeps 4 Tow it with a small suv

Salt Lake City, Utah

4 16ft

Cabover Style C 27-29ft - Salt Lake City V1
Vehicle Price from
$100 / Night

Cabover Style C 27-29ft - Salt Lake City V1

North Salt Lake, Utah

6 28ft

T@B Basic U
Vehicle Price from
$85 / Night

T@B Basic U

South Salt Lake, Utah

3 15ft

Patti Wagon
Vehicle Price from
$109 / Night

Patti Wagon

South Salt Lake, Utah

2 16ft

White Van
Vehicle Price from
$119 / Night

White Van

South Salt Lake, Utah

5 18ft

Red Van
Vehicle Price from
$119 / Night

Red Van

South Salt Lake, Utah

2 18ft

Tan Van
Vehicle Price from
$129 / Night

Tan Van

South Salt Lake, Utah

5 18ft

Places to Visit near Wasatch Front


Salt Lake Temple

The Salt Lake Temple is the centerpiece of the 10-acre (4.0 ha) Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah. Like other LDS temples it is considered sacred by the church and its members and a temple recommend is required to enter, so there are no public tours. The church permitted Life to publish the first public photographs of the building's interior in 1938. The temple grounds are open to the public and are a popular tourist attraction. Due to its location at LDS Church headquarters and its historical significance, it is patronized by Latter-day Saints from many parts of the world. The Salt Lake Temple is also the location of the weekly meetings of the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. As such, there are special meeting rooms in the building for these purposes, including the Holy of Holies, which are not present in other temples. The official name of the Salt Lake Temple is also unique. In 1999, as the building of LDS temples accelerated, the church announced a formal naming convention for all existing and future temples. For temples located in the United States and Canada, the name of the temple is generally the city or town in which the temple is located, followed by the name of the applicable state or province (with no comma). For temples outside of the U.S. and Canada, the name of the temple is generally the city name (as above) followed by the name of the country. However, for reasons on which the church did not elaborate, the Salt Lake Temple was made an exception to the new guidelines and was not renamed the Salt Lake City Utah Temple. The Provo City Center Temple, currently under construction, is the only other temple that does not follow the naming convention.  The temple also includes some elements thought to evoke Solomon's Temple at Jerusalem. It is oriented towards Jerusalem and the large basin used as a baptismal font is mounted on the backs of twelve oxen as was the brazen sea in Solomon's Temple (see Chronicles 4:2-4). However, the literal interpretation of the Biblical verses has been disputed. At the east end of the building, the height of the center pinnacle to the base of the angel Moroni is 210 feet, or 120 cubits, making this Temple 20 cubits taller than the Temple of Solomon. The temple is located in downtown Salt Lake City, with several mountain peaks close by. Nearby, a shallow stream, City Creek, splits and flows both to the west and to the south, flowing into the Jordan River. There is a wall around the 10-acre (4.0 ha) temple site. The surrounding wall became the first permanent structure on what has become known as Temple Square. The wall is a uniform 15 feet high but varies in appearance because of the southwest slope of the site.

George S Eccles Dinosaur Park

Cool dinosaur park, large collection of sculptures (some robotic). Dinosaur Park is an exciting collection from prehistoric crawlers, to predators, to marine animals, and even flying reptiles. More than one hundred dinosaur sculptures fill the park. These realistic full-sized sculptures are based on actual fossil skeletons, and are brought to life by robotics, artistic details and a state-of-the-art sound system.  Come hang with the natives! Dinosaurs indigenous to Utah are a special feature at Dinosaur Park. Past residents like the huge Triceratops, fierce Utahraptor, gentle Parasaurolophus, and the ferocious 25-ft long Ceratosaurus are on display. One of the most popular exhibits is the 45-ft long, 20-ft high Tyrannosaurus. 

Tracy Aviary

In 2005, Tracy Aviary initiated a massive renovation effort that will completely transform its physical landscape and exhibits. This unprecedented transformation is guided by a master plan that directs future exhibits to represent different bird habitats found north and south along the (Western Hemispheric Flyway) – the migratory route used by bird species that frequent the Great Salt Lake and other Utah landscapes.

Mormon Tabernacle Choir

Come see the home of the world-famous Mormon Tabernacle Choir. Visit the dome-shaped auditorium, which is so acoustically sensitive that a pin dropped at the pulpit can be clearly heard at the back of the hall, 170 feet away. Listen to the symphony of sound from one of the world's great musical instruments, a magnificent pipe organ with 11,623 pipes.

Campgrounds and RV Parks near Wasatch Front


Utah Lake State Park

escape to the lake!

Utah's largest freshwater lake provides fishing access for channel catfish, walleye, white bass, black bass, and several species of panfish. Spend an evening RV or tent camping, then powerboat, canoe, or sail the day away on Utah Lake. Utah Lake is unique in that it is one of the largest freshwater lakes in the West and yet it lies in an arid area that receives only about 15 inches of rainfall a year. The mouth of the Provo River, where it empties into Utah Lake, was undoubtedly a very popular camping place for the early inhabitants of Utah Valley.In fall 1776, the Dominguez - Escalante party traversed Spanish Fork Canyon and on September 21, climbed a small hill near its mouth and looked down upon the large lake situated in a vast valley. One member of that party, Bernardo Y. Pacheco, reported to his king, "This place is the most pleasant, beautiful and fertile in all New Spain." From the time of Escalante's exploration until the early part of the nineteenth century, no accurate records revealing further travel to Utah Lake are available.A thriving market for furs brought another breed of men into Utah Valley, the mountain men. Some who visited near the lake were Peter Skeen Ogden, Osborne Russell, Daniel T. Potts, Jim Bridger and Jedediah Strong Smith. Smith, who in a letter written in 1827, became one of the first men to mention Utah as the name of the lake. In 1844 and 1845, JohnC. Fremont visited the lake.Local leaders, especially boaters, had been interested in construction of a facility on the lake that would permit them to launch boats year round. In 1933, an application requesting the help of the Civilian Conservation Corps was made and a marina was completed within a few years. Upon completion, Provo City began constructing shoreline picnic and camp facilities.Opened to the public as a state park in 1970. Park Elevation: 4,500 feet

Visit Utah Lake State Park

Springville / Provo KOA

where the mountains meet the valley

The Wasatch Range forms the magnificent mountain backdrop for this KOA just south of Provo. The campground is easy to reach - just minutes off I-15 - and ready to welcome campers with Camping Cabins, tent sites and paved pull-thrus. A large clubhouse can host up to 130 people and has a full kitchen, heat/AC and big- screen TV. Make new friends around the pool, picnic pavilion, fire pit, game room, or at the campground's special events, such as car shows and luaus. This KOA offers convenient access to restaurants, shops, a water park, university sports and the myriad attractions of the Salt Lake City metro area. Wilderness is right at your doorstep too. Head into the canyons for hiking and four-wheeling. Birders will enjoy spotting cranes, pelicans and other species passing through this Western migration route. Visit in winter with your skis, snowshoes or snowmobile to experience Utah's legendary powder snows. Pool: Memorial Weekend - Labor Day Weekend. Max pull thru: 70 feet. Your host: Jenny Craigmiles.

Visit Springville / Provo KOA

Mighway, proud to be part of the TH2 group of companies

Meet some of the other businesses in the TH2 group


Thor Industries

Thor Industries

Parent of brands like Airstream®, Thor Industries owns companies that together represent the world’s largest RV manufacturer.

Road Bear RV

Road Bear RV

From 1980, when they built their first Camper Van, to today, Road Bear has been on an unquestioning quest to 'be the best for the customer'.

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers helps people discover the world around them in an entirely new way by streamlining travel into an engaging and intuitive process.

TH2

TH2

TH2 is a joint venture created by travel giants: Thor Industries, the world’s largest RV manufacturer, and thl, the world’s largest RV rental and sales operator.