Visit Southwestern United States with Mighway

Rent an RV in Southwestern United States


The Southwestern United States (also known as the American Southwest) is a region of the United States which includes Arizona, the western portion of New Mexico, bordered on the east by the Llano Estacado, southern Colorado and Utah below the 39th parallel, the "horn" of Texas below New Mexico, the southernmost triangle of Nevada, and the most southeastern portion of California, which encompasses the Mojave and Colorado Deserts. The population of the area is around 11 million people, with over half that in Arizona; the most populous cities are Phoenix, El Paso, Las Vegas, Albuquerque, and Tucson. Most of the area was part of the Viceroyalty of New Spain in the Spanish Empire before becoming part of Mexico. It became part of the United States through the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the Gadsden Purchase.

RV Rental Southwestern United States


2012 Forest River SUNSEEKER 2250
Vehicle Price from
$185 / Night

2012 Forest River SUNSEEKER 2250

Madera, California

Sleeps 6 Toilet Shower

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Slideout AC37 RV 37ft - San Bernardino
Vehicle Price from
$301 / Night

Slideout AC37 RV 37ft - San Bernardino

San Bernardino, California

Sleeps 5 Toilet Shower

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2007 27' VORTEX
Vehicle Price from
$165 / Night

2007 27' VORTEX

Riverside, California

Sleeps 8 Toilet Shower

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Luxury RV Rentals - Monaco Knight w/4 slides
Vehicle Price from
$200 / Night

Luxury RV Rentals - Monaco Knight w/4 slides

Glendale, Arizona

Sleeps 6 Toilet Shower

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Mercedes Winnebago View 24J RV
Vehicle Price from
$275 / Night

Mercedes Winnebago View 24J RV

Calabasas, California

Sleeps 6 Toilet Shower

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Cabover Style C 31-32ft - Las Vegas V1
Vehicle Price from
$215 / Night

Cabover Style C 31-32ft - Las Vegas V1

Las Vegas, Nevada

Sleeps 6 Toilet Shower

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Fleetwood Bounder 32'
Vehicle Price from
$140 / Night

Fleetwood Bounder 32'

Huachuca City, Arizona

Sleeps 6 Toilet Shower

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Cabover Style C22 RV - Las Vegas/Henderson
Vehicle Price from
$128 / Night

Cabover Style C22 RV - Las Vegas/Henderson

Las Vegas, Nevada

Sleeps 5 Toilet Shower

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Places to Visit near Southwestern United States


Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area

The Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area in Nevada is an area managed by the Bureau of Land Management as part of its National Landscape Conservation System, and protected as a National Conservation Area. It is located about 15mi west of Las Vegas, and easily seen from the Las Vegas Strip. The area is visited by over 1 million visitors each year.The conservation area showcases a set of large red rock formations: a set of sandstone peaks and walls called the Keystone Thrust. The walls are up to high, making them a popular hiking and rock climbing destination. The highest point is La Madre Mountain, at.A one-way loop road, 13 miles (21 km) long, provides vehicle access to many of the features in the area. Several side roads and parking areas allow access to many of the trails located in the area. A visitor center is located at the start of the loop road. The loop road is very popular for bicycle touring; it begins with a moderate climb, then is mostly downhill or flat. Red Rock Canyon itself is a side-canyon accessible only by a four-wheel-drive road off of the scenic loop. The unnamed but often-visited valley cut through by State Route 159 is commonly, but incorrectly, referred to as Red Rock Canyon. The massive wall of rock called the Wilson Cliffs, or Keystone Thrust, can be seen to the west along this highway.

Bellagio Fountains

The Fountains of the Bellagio perform a magnificent display (set to music) every 15 minutes in the evenings and also every hour on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. Show times can vary on public holidays.

Fremont Street Experience

What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas...except maybe if you pee yourself while on a zipline through the city 77 feet above the pavement. You don't forget something like that. SlotZilla, Vegas's first zipline experience has just opened. "Fliers" climb a 12 story slot machine (because ziplining across Sin City could be a gamble...on whether or not you'll lose your lunch), are harnessed up, and then take off over the hustle and bustle of Las Vegas's Fremont Street Experience mall . Ziplines in cities aren't exactly common, and there's no better city to see from that high up— they're even open into the wee hours of the morning, so you can see the mall all lit up in its neon glory. They've also got a "zoom line" coming soon— riders are strapped into a harness "Superman-style" and sent careening across the sky. Anyone that's willing to do that must be, in my opinion, some sort of superhero, right? -Roadtrippers The Fremont Street Experience (FSE) is a pedestrian mall and attraction in downtown Las Vegas, Nevada. The FSE occupies the westernmost 5 blocks of Fremont Street, including the area known for years as "Glitter Gulch," and portions of some other adjacent streets. The attraction is a barrel vault canopy, 90 ft high at the peak and four blocks, or approximately 1500 ft, in length. You are inside the world-famous Golden Nugget casino. Walk across Fremont Street and you are in poker heaven at Binion's, with world famous shrimp cocktail waiting for you down the block at the 100-year old Golden Gate. Legendary casinos, free entertainment, old-fashioned gambling hospitality – this is the vintage Vegas of the Fremont Street Experience. Some say it's almost intimate. You may even run into one of the casino owners while you sit at the blackjack table.

High Roller Las Vegas

High Roller is a 550-foot tall, 520-foot diameter giant Ferris wheel on the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada, United States of America. It opened to the public on March 31, 2014, and is currently the world's tallest Ferris wheel.

Campgrounds and RV Parks near Southwestern United States


Dead Horse Point State Park

ever changing landscape

From the prominence of Dead Horse Point, 2,000 feet above a gooseneck in the Colorado River, an ever changing landscape unfurls. Immense vertical cliffs meet with canyons carved by ice, water and wind creating a visual masterpiece. Plants and animals surviving on the edge of existence face many challenges of extreme conditions within this high desert environment. Stories of ancient hunters, resting along the cliff tops while knapping chert in preparation for the next hunt, and cowboys of the late 1800’s, chasing wild mustangs onto Dead Horse Point, using the narrow neck to block off the natural corral. What story will you discover on your visit to Dead Horse Point State Park?

Visit Dead Horse Point State Park

Valley of Fire State Park

Nevada’s Oldest and Largest State Park!

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest state park, dedicated in 1935. Ancient trees and early man are represented throughout the park by areas of petrified wood and 3,000 year-old Indian petroglyphs. Popular activities include camping, hiking, picnicking and photography. The park offers a full-scale visitor center with extensive interpretive displays. Several group use areas are also available. The park is open all year. Valley of Fire State Park is six miles from Lake Mead and 55 miles northeast of Las Vegas via Interstate 15 and on exit 75. The Valley of Fire derives its name from red sandstone formations, formed from great shifting sand dunes during the age of dinosaurs, 150 million years ago. Complex uplifting and faulting of the region, followed by extensive erosion, have created the present landscape. Other important rock formations include limestones, shales, and conglomerates. Prehistoric users of the Valley of Fire included the Basket Maker people and later the Anasazi Pueblo farmers from the nearby fertile Moapa Valley. The span of approximate occupation has been dated from 300 B.C.E. to 1150 C.E. Their visits probably involved hunting, food gathering, and religious ceremonies, although scarcity of water would have limited the length of their stay. Fine examples of rock art left by these ancient peoples can be found at several sites within the park. Winters are mild with temperatures ranging from freezing to 75 degrees. Daily summer highs usually exceed 100 degrees F and may reach 120 degrees. Summer temperatures can vary widely from day to night. Average annual rainfall is four inches, coming in the form of light winter showers and summer thunderstorms. Spring and fall are the preferred seasons for visiting the Valley of Fire. The area plant community is dominated by widely spaced creosote bush, burro bush, and brittlebush. Several cactus species, including beaver tail and cholla, are also common. The springtime bloom of such plants as the desert marigold, indigo bush, and desert mallow are often spectacular along park roads. Resident birds include the raven, house finch, sage sparrow, and roadrunner. Many migrant birds also pass through the park. Most desert animals are nocturnal and not frequently seen by the passing motorist. Many species of lizards and snakes are common in the park, as well as the coyote, kit fox, spotted skunk, black tailed jackrabbit, and antelope ground squirrel. The desert tortoise is a rare species and is protected by state law. If you are lucky enough to come across one please leave this likeable and harmless creature to live its life in peace in its own environment. Visitor Information: The visitor center provides exhibits on the geology, ecology, prehistory, and history of the park and the nearby region. It is strongly recommended that each visitor make this an early stop after entering the park. Postcards, books, and souvenirs are on sale for your convenience. The visitor center is open daily from 8:30 am to 4:30. The rest of the park closes at sunset. Entrance Fee: An entrance fee is charged per vehicle upon entering the park. This fee is collected at the fee booth or at self-pay stations. Camping: Additional fees are charged for the use of camping areas and is payable at the campgrounds. All campsites are first-come, first-serve. There are two campgrounds with a combined total of 72 units. Campsites are equipped with shaded tables, grills, water, and restrooms. A dump station and showers are available. A camping limit of 14 days in a 30-day period is enforced. RV Camping: RV sites with power and water hookups are now available. A $10 surcharge is added to the regular camping fee for the use of these sites. Picnicking: Shaded areas with restrooms are located at Atlatl Rock, Seven Sisters, the Cabins, near Mouse's Tank trailhead, and White Domes. Group Area: There are three group areas, each accommodating up to 45 people, though parking is limited. They are available for overnight camping and picnicking by reservation only. Call the park for reservations: (702) 397-2088. Hiking: Many intriguing hikes are available to visitors. Inquire at the visitor center for suggestions on day hikes of varying length and terrain.

Visit Valley of Fire State Park

Mighway, proud to be part of the TH2 group of companies

Meet some of the other businesses in the TH2 group


Thor Industries

Thor Industries

Parent of brands like Airstream®, Thor Industries owns companies that together represent the world’s largest RV manufacturer.

Road Bear RV

Road Bear RV

From 1980, when they built their first Camper Van, to today, Road Bear has been on an unquestioning quest to 'be the best for the customer'.

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers helps people discover the world around them in an entirely new way by streamlining travel into an engaging and intuitive process.

TH2

TH2

TH2 is a joint venture created by travel giants: Thor Industries, the world’s largest RV manufacturer, and thl, the world’s largest RV rental and sales operator.