Visit Franklin, Middle Tennessee with Mighway

Rent an RV in Franklin


Franklin is a city in and county seat of Williamson County, Tennessee, United States. Located about 21 miles south of Nashville, it is one of the principal cities of the Nashville metropolitan area. Since 1980, its population has increased more than fivefold and, based on its 2013 estimated population of 68,886, it is ranked as the seventh-largest city in Tennessee.

RV Rental Franklin


2018 25' Zinger 252BH - Nashville 2
Vehicle Price from
$150 / Night

2018 25' Zinger 252BH - Nashville 2

Nashville, Tennessee

9 25ft

2019 Puma 28DSBC - Nashville 5
Vehicle Price from
$175 / Night

2019 Puma 28DSBC - Nashville 5

Nashville, Tennessee

10 28ft

2018 25' Zinger 252BH - Nashville 5
Vehicle Price from
$150 / Night

2018 25' Zinger 252BH - Nashville 5

Nashville, Tennessee

9 25ft

2018 Zinger 18BH - Nashville 2
Vehicle Price from
$99 / Night

2018 Zinger 18BH - Nashville 2

Nashville, Tennessee

6 18ft

2019 Zinger 280BH - Nashville 3
Vehicle Price from
$175 / Night

2019 Zinger 280BH - Nashville 3

Nashville, Tennessee

10 28ft

2019 Z-1 Zinger 211RD Nashville 3
Vehicle Price from
$117 / Night

2019 Z-1 Zinger 211RD Nashville 3

Nashville, Tennessee

6 21ft

2019 Z-1 Zinger 211RD - Nashville 4
Vehicle Price from
$117 / Night

2019 Z-1 Zinger 211RD - Nashville 4

Nashville, Tennessee

6 21ft

2018 Zinger 18BH - Nashville 5
Vehicle Price from
$99 / Night

2018 Zinger 18BH - Nashville 5

Nashville, Tennessee

6 18ft

Places to Visit near Franklin


Historic Carnton Plantation

Carnton was built in 1826 by former Nashville mayor Randal McGavock (1768-1843). Throughout the nineteenth century it was frequently visited by those shaping Tennessee and American history, including President Andrew Jackson. Carnton grew to become one of the premier farms in Williamson County, Tennessee. Randal McGavock’s son John (1815-1893) inherited the farm upon his father’s death. John McGavock married Carrie Elizabeth Winder (1829-1905) in December 1848 and they had five children during the subsequent years, three of whom died at young ages - Martha (1849-1862), Mary Elizabeth (1851-1858), and John Randal (1854). The surviving children, Winder (1857-1907) and Hattie (1855-1932), are pictured (left) circa 1865. Beginning at 4 p.m. on November 30, 1864, Carnton was witness to one of the bloodiest battles of the entire Civil War. Everything the McGavock family ever knew was forever changed. The Confederate Army of Tennessee furiously assaulted the Federal army entrenched along the southern edge of Franklin. The resulting battle, believed to be the bloodiest five hours of the Civil War, involved a massive frontal assault larger than Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg. The majority of the combat occurred in the dark and at close quarters. The Battle of Franklin lasted barely five hours and led to some 9,500 soldiers being killed, wounded, captured, or counted as missing. Nearly 7,000 of that number were Confederate troops. Carnton served as the largest field hospital in the area for hundreds of wounded and dying Confederate soldiers

Carter House

The small town of Franklin, Tennessee had been a Federal military post since the fall of Nashville in early 1862. Late in the summer of 1864, Confederate President Jefferson Davis replaced Gen. Joseph E. Johnston with Gen. John Bell Hood.  Hood, a West Point graduate, had won acclaim for his achievements in Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. He had also suffered a grievous wound to his left arm at Gettysburg and his right leg had been amputated near the hip after being shot at Chickamauga.  By the end of 1865, the Federal government had removed the bodies of the Federal dead and moved the bodies to the National Cemetery at Murfreesboro. In the spring of 1866, the McGavock family donated two acres near their home, Carnton, to establish a Confederate Cemetery where the remains of 1,481 Confederate soldiers were laid to rest. The Carter House was purchased by the State of Tennessee in 1951 and it was first opened to the public in 1953. Today it is managed, along with Carnton, by the Battle of Franklin Trust and is dedicated to the Carter family and all of the Americans who fought in this battle. Their legacy is our mission.

Lotz House

In 1855, German immigrant Johann Albert Lotz, purchased 5 acres of land from Fountain Branch Carter. Lotz, a classically trained master woodworker from Saxony, completed his home three years later. By trade, Mr. Lotz was a master carpenter and a piano maker. He also repaired guitars and violins. His home, served as his “show house” to demonstrate his carpentry work to potential clients interested in hiring him for his services. The three fireplace mantles demonstrated his range from simple to very complex designs, all of them are carved from different kinds of wood. In addition, the home has an impressive free floating, black walnut wrap around hand rail and cantilevered staircase. To accomplish this engineering feat in the mid 19th century is truly remarkable. What’s more, the newel post at the bottom of the staircase is actually an inverted leg of one Mr. Lotz pianos. The outside of the home indeed is a testament to Mr. Lotz talent. All the hand carved acorn finials; millwork and cartouches were constructed by Lotz. The house, which has been on the National Historic Register since 1976 is located in the heart of downtown historic Franklin, Tennessee at “ground zero” of the Battle of Franklin which was a pivotal battle in the American Civil War. On the night of November 29, 1864 approximately 25,000 Northern soldiers retreated from Spring Hill, Tennessee into Franklin, Tennessee. These troops quickly dug protective trenches south of the Lotz House and waited to see if they would be attacked by the Confederate army. When the Lotz family awakened on the morning of November 30, in effect the Federal Line had been established in their front yard. Mr. Lotz, fearing that his family, his wife Margaretha, his sons Paul and Augustus and daughter Matilda would not survive the battle in their “wooden house,” they sought refuge 110 steps across the street in the brick basement of The Carter House. For 17 hours while the battle raged all around them, the Lotz along with 20 other people remained safe and survived. When they exited the basement the next morning, they were horrified to see the bodies of dead soldiers six feet deep between The Carter House and their home across the street. Indeed, historians describe the fighting that took place at the Battle of Franklin and in the Lotz front yard “some of the most severe hand to hand fighting during the four year long war.” When the dust had settled the body count would be horrific. Ten thousand Americans had been killed, wounded or missing. The Lotz House served as a hospital for the wounded soldiers on both sides until the following summer. To this day, one can step into the Lotz House and see numerous blood stains in all of the room. The house itself suffered severe battle damage, but as the structure served as Lotz’ “show house,” he was quick to make repairs. However, some of the battle scars remain. During the battle a solid shot cannon ball crashed through the roof, smashing into the floor of an upstairs bedroom and down to the first floor. The large repaired patch made by Mr. Lotz remains in the second floor. And on the first floor where the cannon ball finally came to rest one can clearly see where the hot lead ball first hit, burning the floor then rolled.

Natchez Trace Wine Trail

The 444-mile Natchez Trace Parkway commemorates an ancient trail that connected southern portions of the Mississippi River, through Alabama, to today's central Tennessee. The Tennessee cities along the historic Natchez Trace Parkway are Nashville, Franklin, Leiper's Fork and Brentwood. Visitors can experience this National Scenic Byway and All-American Road through driving, hiking, biking, horseback riding and camping. Along the Trail, enjoy Franklin and Leiper's Fork, historic communities just south of Nashville. Leiper's Fork combines an eclectic mix of country simplicity and sophisticated charm. An outdoor lawn-chair theatre along with antiques, artisan and unique gift shops plus delicious country cooking provide a fun time for travelers venturing off the Parkway. Franklin offers the grand beauty of Victorian and antebellum architecture, breathtaking, rolling Middle Tennessee countryside as a backdrop. Known for its award-winning Main Street and small town charm, Franklin showcases antique galleries and unique shops in its historic downtown district. Visitors can explore Civil War history throughout the county. The wineries featured along the Natchez Trace Trail are Amber Falls Winery and Cellars, Grinder's Switch Winery, Keg Springs Winery and Natchez Hills Vineyard.

Mighway, proud to be part of the TH2 group of companies

Meet some of the other businesses in the TH2 group


Thor Industries

Thor Industries

Parent of brands like Airstream®, Thor Industries owns companies that together represent the world’s largest RV manufacturer.

Road Bear RV

Road Bear RV

From 1980, when they built their first Camper Van, to today, Road Bear has been on an unquestioning quest to 'be the best for the customer'.

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers helps people discover the world around them in an entirely new way by streamlining travel into an engaging and intuitive process.

TH2

TH2

TH2 is a joint venture created by travel giants: Thor Industries, the world’s largest RV manufacturer, and thl, the world’s largest RV rental and sales operator.