Visit Franklin, Middle Tennessee with Mighway

Rent an RV in Franklin


Franklin is a city in and county seat of Williamson County, Tennessee, United States. Located about 21 miles south of Nashville, it is one of the principal cities of the Nashville metropolitan area. Since 1980, its population has increased more than fivefold and, based on its 2013 estimated population of 68,886, it is ranked as the seventh-largest city in Tennessee.

RV Rental Franklin


2018 25' Zinger 252BH - Nashville 4
Vehicle Price from
$150 / Night

2018 25' Zinger 252BH - Nashville 4

Nashville, Tennessee

9 25ft

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Class A Diesel: 2013 40' Fleetwood Discovery - Nashville
Vehicle Price from
$315 / Night

Class A Diesel: 2013 40' Fleetwood Discovery - Nashville

Nashville, Tennessee

4 40ft

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2018 25' Zinger 252BH - Nashville 1
Vehicle Price from
$150 / Night

2018 25' Zinger 252BH - Nashville 1

Nashville, Tennessee

9 25ft

More info >

2018 Zinger 18BH - Nashville 5
Vehicle Price from
$99 / Night

2018 Zinger 18BH - Nashville 5

Nashville, Tennessee

6 18ft

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2018 Jayco Jay Feather
Vehicle Price from
$95 / Night

2018 Jayco Jay Feather

Nashville, Tennessee

7 19ft

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2018 Forest River 27 QB Boost XLR --- TOY HAULER
Vehicle Price from
$149 / Night

2018 Forest River 27 QB Boost XLR --- TOY HAULER

Nashville, Tennessee

6 27ft

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2018 25' Zinger 252BH - Nashville 2
Vehicle Price from
$150 / Night

2018 25' Zinger 252BH - Nashville 2

Nashville, Tennessee

9 25ft

More info >

2019 Z-1 Zinger 211RD - Nashville 2
Vehicle Price from
$117 / Night

2019 Z-1 Zinger 211RD - Nashville 2

Nashville, Tennessee

6 21ft

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Places to Visit near Franklin


Carter House

The small town of Franklin, Tennessee had been a Federal military post since the fall of Nashville in early 1862. Late in the summer of 1864, Confederate President Jefferson Davis replaced Gen. Joseph E. Johnston with Gen. John Bell Hood.  Hood, a West Point graduate, had won acclaim for his achievements in Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. He had also suffered a grievous wound to his left arm at Gettysburg and his right leg had been amputated near the hip after being shot at Chickamauga.  By the end of 1865, the Federal government had removed the bodies of the Federal dead and moved the bodies to the National Cemetery at Murfreesboro. In the spring of 1866, the McGavock family donated two acres near their home, Carnton, to establish a Confederate Cemetery where the remains of 1,481 Confederate soldiers were laid to rest. The Carter House was purchased by the State of Tennessee in 1951 and it was first opened to the public in 1953. Today it is managed, along with Carnton, by the Battle of Franklin Trust and is dedicated to the Carter family and all of the Americans who fought in this battle. Their legacy is our mission.

Historic Carnton Plantation

Carnton was built in 1826 by former Nashville mayor Randal McGavock (1768-1843). Throughout the nineteenth century it was frequently visited by those shaping Tennessee and American history, including President Andrew Jackson. Carnton grew to become one of the premier farms in Williamson County, Tennessee. Randal McGavock’s son John (1815-1893) inherited the farm upon his father’s death. John McGavock married Carrie Elizabeth Winder (1829-1905) in December 1848 and they had five children during the subsequent years, three of whom died at young ages - Martha (1849-1862), Mary Elizabeth (1851-1858), and John Randal (1854). The surviving children, Winder (1857-1907) and Hattie (1855-1932), are pictured (left) circa 1865. Beginning at 4 p.m. on November 30, 1864, Carnton was witness to one of the bloodiest battles of the entire Civil War. Everything the McGavock family ever knew was forever changed. The Confederate Army of Tennessee furiously assaulted the Federal army entrenched along the southern edge of Franklin. The resulting battle, believed to be the bloodiest five hours of the Civil War, involved a massive frontal assault larger than Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg. The majority of the combat occurred in the dark and at close quarters. The Battle of Franklin lasted barely five hours and led to some 9,500 soldiers being killed, wounded, captured, or counted as missing. Nearly 7,000 of that number were Confederate troops. Carnton served as the largest field hospital in the area for hundreds of wounded and dying Confederate soldiers

Franklin Visitor Center

The Visitor Center, located in Historic Downtown Franklin, offers Franklin, TN shirts, mugs, hats, and more! Be sure to check out the selection of merchandise when you stop in to pick up your visitor guide or point of interest map. While you're there, pick up a banjo and strum a few chords! We've got a picking corner open for all to play! Check out our history wall to learn more about the history of Williamson County and how Franklin came to be the Greatest Southern Town!

Fort Granger Park

Fort Granger is a property in Franklin, Tennessee that is now a City of Franklin park, in the central Franklin area. It was part of American Civil War fortifications of Franklin and includes trenches dug by Civil War soldiers. The Union Army captured Nashville early in 1862 and occupied Franklin within a few weeks. The troops occupying Franklin were under the command of Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger, for whom the fort is named. The Union Army, fearful of local unrest and Confederate guerrillas, began planning and construction for an artillery position that would protect the Nashville railroad line nearby. Construction began in 1863 and was overseen by Capt. W. E. Morrill. A letter written by James L. Rogers, 98th Ohio Infantry, on June 4, 1863 reveals some of the Federal units who constructed Fort Granger. Rogers states in part, "For the last 2 months and over we have been camped in, near Franklin, Tenn.. While our stay there, our time was principally occupied in working on the fortifications and scouting occasionally. And on the 2nd day of June General Grainger’s commenced including the 125th.O., 124th., O, 113th., O., 121st.O., 98th.O., 40th.O., 115th.ILL., 96th., ILL., 12ILL., & 84th Ind., and 2 or 3 regts of cavalry & 3 battries left Franklin at 6 a.m." The Samuel Boyd Map shows the positions of the Federal unit's camp sites at Franklin in 1863. The fort was to be located on Figuer's Bluff, just north of the Harpeth River and parallel to the railroad to Nashville. The fort was built on Figuer's Bluff because the bluff had military control over the Harpeth River bridge of the Tennessee and Alabama Railroad and it had control over the southern and northern approaches to Franklin. The completed fort incorporated nearly 275,000 square feet. The fort is approximately 781 feet long and 346 wide. Until the Battle of Franklin, the fort was only occupied by a small garrison. The entrance to the fort was called the 'Sally Port.' The strongest part of the fortification, called 'The Cavalier,' was the location where the ground was the highest. This 'fort within a fort' was meant for times of overpowering attacks where defenders could make a final stand against invaders. The Cavalier was ideal for artillery because it provided the best view of the surrounding landscape. The Union army hanged two Confederate spies at the fort on June 9, 1863. The artillery in the fort was utilized twice in 1863 against Confederate cavalry forces. In September 1864, Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood led the Army of Tennessee against Union Gen. William T. Sherman's supply lines after Sherman defeated Hood at Atlanta. Hood directed the army north into Tennessee. Union General John M. Schofield slowed Hood at Columbia and Spring Hill before falling back to Franklin. Guns from Fort Granger provided an enfilading fire upon Confederate attack in the Battle of Franklin on November 30, 1864. The commanding Union general, John M. Schofield, spent most of his time during the battle in Fort Granger. The Confederate Army was subject to massed fire from the Union artillery in the fort. Four 3-inch rifled cannons in Fort Granger were fired by Capt. Giles J. Cockerill, Battery D, 1st Ohio Light Artillery. The Confederates suffered serious casualties to the 163 rounds fired by Cockerill’s guns. The right wing of the Confederate line, commanded by Gen. A. P. Stewart’s Corps suffered the most from these rounds, A area of the property, including one contributing structure and one contributing site, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. There is a boardwalk on the southern side of the fort that leads to a trail, eventually connecting to Pinkerton Park. Roper's Knob Fortifications is another NRHP-listed fortification on the Franklin battlefield area.

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TH2

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