Visit Washington, Pacific Northwest with Mighway

Rent an RV in Washington


Washington (/ˈwɒʃɪŋtən/) is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States located north of Oregon, west of Idaho, and south of the Canadian province of British Columbia on the coast of the Pacific Ocean. Named after George Washington, the first President of the United States, the state was made out of the western part of the Washington Territory, which had been ceded by Britain in 1846 in accordance with the Oregon Treaty in the settlement of the Oregon boundary dispute. It was admitted to the Union as the 42nd state in 1889. Olympia is the state capital. Washington is sometimes referred to as Washington State or the State of Washington to distinguish it from Washington, D.C., the capital of the U.S., which is often shortened to Washington. Washington is the 18th largest state with an area of 71,362 square miles (184,827 sq km), and the 13th most populous state with over 7 million people. Approximately 60 percent of Washington's residents live in the Seattle metropolitan area, the center of transportation, business, and industry along the Puget Sound region of the Salish Sea, an inlet of the Pacific Ocean consisting of numerous islands, deep fjords, and bays carved out by glaciers. The remainder of the state consists of deep temperate rainforests in the west, mountain ranges in the west, central, northeast and far southeast, and a semi-arid basin region in the east, central, and south, given over to intensive agriculture. Washington is the second most populous state on the West Coast and in the Western United States, after California. Mount Rainier, an active stratovolcano, is the state's highest elevation at almost 14,411 feet (4,392 m) and is the most topographically prominent mountain in the contiguous United States. Washington is a leading lumber producer. Its rugged surface is rich in stands of Douglas fir, hemlock, ponderosa pine, white pine, spruce, larch, and cedar. The state is the biggest producer of apples, hops, pears, red raspberries, spearmint oil, and sweet cherries, and ranks high in the production of apricots, asparagus, dry edible peas, grapes, lentils, peppermint oil, and potatoes. Livestock and livestock products make important contributions to total farm revenue, and the commercial fishing of salmon, halibut, and bottomfish makes a significant contribution to the state's economy. Manufacturing industries in Washington include aircraft and missiles, shipbuilding and other transportation equipment, lumber, food processing, metals and metal products, chemicals, and machinery. Washington has over 1,000 dams, including the Grand Coulee Dam, built for a variety of purposes including irrigation, power, flood control, and water storage.

RV Rental Washington


White Walrus: Freightliner Sprinter
Vehicle Price from
$185 / Night

White Walrus: Freightliner Sprinter

Portland, Oregon

2 23ft

2019 Zinger 280BH -Seattle 2
Vehicle Price from
$175 / Night

2019 Zinger 280BH -Seattle 2

Kent, Washington

10 28ft

Outbound Rigs TigerMoth Trek
Vehicle Price from
$115 / Night

Outbound Rigs TigerMoth Trek

Seattle, Washington

2 12ft

SPRINTER for rent in portland oregon
Vehicle Price from
$185 / Night

SPRINTER for rent in portland oregon

Portland, Oregon

3 25ft

Eurovan camper 2
Vehicle Price from
$145 / Night

Eurovan camper 2

Portland, Oregon

4 17ft

VanHalen: Vanagon Camper
Vehicle Price from
$170 / Night

VanHalen: Vanagon Camper

Portland, Oregon

4 14ft

Bandit
Vehicle Price from
$205 / Night

Bandit

Portland, Oregon

5 18ft

Outbound Rigs GnarV Campervan
Vehicle Price from
$165 / Night

Outbound Rigs GnarV Campervan

Seattle, Washington

2 15ft

Places to Visit near Washington


Mount Rainier National Park

Ascending to 14,410 feet above sea level, Mount Rainier stands as an icon in the Washington landscape. An active volcano, Mount Rainier is the most glaciated peak in the contiguous U.S.A., spawning six major rivers. Subalpine wildflower meadows ring the icy volcano while ancient forest cloaks Mount Rainier’s lower slopes. Wildlife abounds in the park’s ecosystems. A lifetime of discovery awaits. In the early 1930s the Civilian Conservation Corp constructed fire lookouts throughout the park to help protect the surrounding area from fire. Four historic lookouts still remain in the Mount Rainier National Historic Landmark District including Tolmie, Shriner, Fremont, and Gobblers Knob. Mount Rainier National Park is a United States National Park located in southeast Pierce County and northeast Lewis County in Washington state. It was one of the US's earliest National Parks, having been established on March 2, 1899 as the fifth national park in the United States.

Snoqualmie Falls

Snoqualmie Falls is one of Washington state’s most popular scenic attractions. More than 1.5 million visitors come to the Falls every year. At the falls, you will find a two-acre park, gift shop, observation deck, the Salish Lodge and the famous 270 foot waterfall. The park and free viewing area are open from dawn until dusk. Leashed pets are allowed. The distance between the free parking lot and the viewing platform is approximately 200 feet and is wheelchair accessible. According to Seattle PI: Several thousand years ago, when the glaciers receded, they left a fertile plain near Snoqualmie Falls. When Native Americans arrived, they found a bounty of edible bulbs, roots and berries on the prairie. Deer and mountain goats were plentiful. Though there were no salmon above the falls, the upper Snoqualmie River became a seasonal rendezvous and meeting place as trade among native peoples increased. The Snoqualmie Tribe (a subgroup of the Coast Salish) established a camp at the base of Mount Si. They also established villages at Fall City and Tolt (Carnation). Snoqualmie is the English pronunciation of “sah-KOH-koh” or “Sdob-dwahibbluh,” a Salish word meaning moon. As a spiritual place, it gave birth to many legends. One tells of “S’Beow” (the beaver), who climbed into the sky to bring trees and fire down to earth. The Native Americans who roamed the valley were known as people of the moon. White settlers began to arrive in the valley by the early 1850s. Long before, the falls became a tourist destination; pioneer women would edge as close to the falls as they could while friends held on to their dresses to keep them from falling. Jeremiah Borst was the first permanent white settler in the Snoqualmie Valley and is known to some as “the father of the Snoqualmie Valley.” Josiah Merrit (“Uncle Si”) built a cabin at the base of a local peak in 1862 (the peak became known as Uncle Si’s mountain — now Mount Si). He raised vegetables and hogs and kept an orchard. According to local historians, he was a rugged man who sometimes hauled bacon to the large settlements. To do so necessitated hauling the load on a sled to the river, canoeing downstream, strapping the load to his back and climbing down the 268-foot falls, hiking several miles, and then canoeing the rest of the way to Everett or Seattle. By 1877, there were several logging operations in the region. In early days, logs were floated over the falls and down the river to Everett and Puget Sound. By 1889, entrepreneurs funded and built a railroad (the Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern) into the valley, opening up timber resources to the world market. In 1889, the town of Snoqualmie was platted by Charles Baker, a civil engineer. He also constructed an underground power plant at the falls in the 1890s (those original generators are still functioning today). The power plant resulted in electricity and jobs for locals, and soon a small company town was established at the falls. In 1911, a second powerhouse was constructed. Such large waterfalls often attract daredevils. When that first passenger train arrived in 1889, it was a big event — more than 1,000 people turned up for food, celebration and entertainment. A Mr. Blondin successfully walked a tightrope over the falls. In 1890, Charlie Anderson was less fortunate. He parachuted into the canyon from a hot-air balloon, but when he opened the chute a strong air current pushed him toward the falls. As the crowd watched in horror, another gust pulled him in another direction and dropped him on a large boulder; he died that night.  Courtesy Seattle PI – Thursday, February 6, 2003 http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/getaways/107345_hikebar06.shtml

Chihuly Garden and Glass

Chihuly Garden and Glass provides a look at the inspiration and influences that inform the career of artist Dale Chihuly. Located at Seattle Center, Chihuly Garden and Glass includes an Exhibition Hall, the centerpiece Glasshouse and a lush Garden. The Exhibition Hall contains eight galleries and three Drawing Walls, offering visitors a comprehensive look at Chihuly’s significant series of work; the Glasshouse presents a suspended 1,400-piece, 100-foot-long sculpture; and the Garden is a backdrop for four monumental sculptures and other installations.

North Cascades National Park

These mountains are calling for you. Less than three hours from Seattle, an alpine landscape beckons. Discover communities of life adapted to persistent moisture in the west and recurrent fire in the east — all sensitive to climate change. Explore jagged peaks crowned by more than 300 glaciers. Contemplate waterfalls cascading into deep valleys. Help steward the ecological heart of the Cascades. North Cascades National Park Complex spans the Cascade Crest from the temperate rainforest of the wet west-side to the dry ponderosa pine ecosystem of the east. The park encompasses landscapes with over 9,000 feet of vertical relief. There results a high diversity of plants, over 1,600 species so far identified, and many other organisms adapted to a wide spectrum of habitats. The relatively new mountains, glaciers and streams of North Cascades lie near a dynamic interface of tectonic plates and provide an opportunity to study geologic processes unfolding through time. Geologists and others seek answers to questions of global climate change, mountain building and erosion, volcanism, glaciation, stream dynamics, and more. North Cascades National Park is a U.S. National Park located in the state of Washington. The park is the largest of the three National Park Service units that comprise the North Cascades National Park Service Complex. Several national wilderness areas and British Columbia parkland adjoin the National Park. The park features rugged mountain peaks. Less than three hours from Seattle, an alpine landscape beckons. Discover communities of life adapted to persistent moisture in the west and recurrent fire in the east — all sensitive to climate change. Explore jagged peaks crowned by more than 300 glaciers. Contemplate waterfalls cascading into deep valleys. Help steward the ecological heart of the Cascades. These mountains are calling for you. North Cascades National Park Service Complex includes 684,000 acres near the crest of the Cascade Mountains from the Canadian border south to Lake Chelan.

Campgrounds and RV Parks near Washington


Palouse Falls State Park

The jewel of eastern Washington

Palouse Falls State Park is a 105-acre camping park with a unique geology and history. The park offers a dramatic view of one of the state's most beautiful waterfalls. Palouse Falls drops from a height of 198 feet with high volumes of water flow in spring and early summer. "Its size and splendor make Palouse Falls one of the most scenic and impressive waterfalls in all of Washington, but its location adds even more magic and wonder to its image. Nestled in a deep coulee, the Palouse River creeps mostly unseen through the scablands north of the Snake River. It is only when you are right at the edge of the river's chasm that you can see and appreciate the deep cut the river makes through the basalt highlands. The same holds true for the falls, which starts in a deep cut and falls into a deeper hole. The falls can't be seen until you are nearly on top of it, but then--wow! A broad, broken plateau of black basalt stretches out to the horizon as you approach the entrance to the state park, when suddenly--boom!--there they are: the thundering waters of Palouse Falls pounding 198 feet into a circular bowl carved out of the cinder-black rock. Winter and spring are the prime times to see the falls. In the dead of winter, the jagged cliffs around the falls are lined with shimmering bands of ice, while in spring, the runoff from snowmelt in the high country has the falls running full bore as a thundering spectacle. Palouse Falls is a photographer's delight.

Visit Palouse Falls State Park

Cougar Rock Campground

Camping on the southwest side of Mt. Rainier

Cougar Rock Campground, on the southwest side of Mt. Rainier National Park, is convenient to the Paradise area. Paradise is the most popular destination in the park, with a lodge and visitor center, many miles of hiking trails and a commanding view of the mountain-the highest in the state and Cascade range.  The main attraction at Mount Rainier National Park is the mountain itself, a massive glacier-clad volcano, peaking at 14,411 ft. and dominating the skyline for hundreds of miles. Visitors travel through majestic old-growth forests, past tumbling waterfalls and historic buildings to reach sub-alpine meadows, where world-famous wildflower displays bloom through July and August. Popular activities in the park include sight-seeing, hiking, rock climbing and camping.  Cougar Rock campground is located at an elevation of 3,180 feet. Summers are dry and cool with daytime temperatures ranging from 60 to 80 degrees. Weather throughout the park can be variable, so visitors should come prepared.

Visit Cougar Rock Campground

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Thor Industries

Thor Industries

Parent of brands like Airstream®, Thor Industries owns companies that together represent the world’s largest RV manufacturer.

Road Bear RV

Road Bear RV

From 1980, when they built their first Camper Van, to today, Road Bear has been on an unquestioning quest to 'be the best for the customer'.

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers helps people discover the world around them in an entirely new way by streamlining travel into an engaging and intuitive process.

TH2

TH2

TH2 is a joint venture created by travel giants: Thor Industries, the world’s largest RV manufacturer, and thl, the world’s largest RV rental and sales operator.

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