Visit Remote, Oregon with Mighway

Rent an RV in Remote


Remote is an unincorporated hamlet in Coos County in the U.S. state of Oregon. It lies near the confluence of Sandy Creek with the Middle Fork Coquille River. Remote was named by local pioneers for its distance from other settlements. Its post office was established in 1887. Oregon Route 42 used to run through the center of the community, but realignment of the highway has left Remote several hundred yards away, along a side road, around a bend and down below the highway, largely shielded by trees from highway view. The town now consists of a combined store with gas pump and post office, and a couple of houses. Like Oregon communities Nimrod and Boring, Remote is often cited on lists of odd place names. William Least Heat-Moon mentions the community in Blue Highways: A Journey Into America.

Places to Visit near Remote


Rose Garden/Japanese Garden Portland, Or

Proclaimed the most authentic Japanese garden outside of Japan, the Portland Japanese Garden is a 5.5-acre haven of tranquil beauty nestled in the scenic west hills of Portland, Oregon. Any time of year is a good time to visit the Portland Japanese Garden. Japanese gardens are created with imagination and designed to display nature’s beauty in all seasons. Spring is the time for fresh greenery and subtle blossoms. Cherry blossoms appear briefly in late February, while late spring flowers include azalea, camellia, and wisteria. Summer’s sunlit shades of green yield an unbroken, calming visual experience. The vibrant colors of fall make autumn a popular visiting time. Autumn is a celebration of nature’s gift of life in the past year, and a transition to the peacefulness of winter. Winter reveals the pure essence of the garden, when all has been stripped away to expose its fundamental structure, spirit, and quiet beauty.

Multnomah Falls Lodge

At the base of Multnomah Falls, the Historic Multnomah Falls Lodge awaits to offer a place of relaxation, a fine meal, the perfect gift, hiking or visitor information, or possibly an espresso or tasty treat to accompany your hike or day trip. The Columbia River Gorge draws visitors from all over the world with its commanding vistas, abundant wildlife, and majestic forests. The towering cliffs that form the Gorge create the backdrop for the Magnificent Multnomah Falls. This natural wonder attracts approximately 2.5 million visitors per year, ranking Multnomah Falls as Oregon’s number 1 visited natural attraction. Multnomah Falls plummets 620 feet in two major steps. The upper fall plunging 542 feet the lower fall 69 feet distinguishing Multnomah Falls as the highest waterfall in the state of Oregon and second highest in the nation. The water flowing over Multnomah Falls water is supplied by natural underground springs that originate on Larch Mountain. In springtime, snowmelt additionally supplies the falls, greatly increasing the flow, width and intensity of the falls’ powerful roaring sound.

Astoria Column

The Astoria Column was erected in 1926 at an elevation of 600 feet atop Coxcomb Hill, the location of the first permanent American Settlement west of the Rockies. Take the time to climb the 164-step spiral staircase to the viewing deck at the top. For indulging in the challenge, you will be greeted by an unforgettable view of the city and surrounding rivers, bay, forest, mountains and Pacific Ocean. And don't forget to purchase a wooden glider at the visitor center (proceeds go to the Column) and watch it soar high above the city...it will rekindle the child in you!

Pittock Mansion

The Pittock Mansion was home to Portland pioneers Henry and Georgiana Pittock from 1914 to 1919. During the late 1800s and the early 1900s, their lives and work paralleled the growth of Portland from a small Northwest town site to a thriving city with a quarter million population. With its eclectic architectural design and richly decorated interior, including family artifacts, the Pittock Mansion stands today as a living memorial of this family’s contributions to the blossoming of Portland and its people. Henry and Georgiana were at the pinnacle of their successful lives when they commissioned architect Edward Foulkes to design and build their new home overlooking Portland, the city they loved. They began planning and designing their new home in 1909. The mansion was completed in 1914, replete with stunningly progressive features including a central vacuum system, intercoms, and indirect lighting. The house also creatively incorporated Turkish, English, and French designs. In keeping with their loyalty to their home state, the Pittocks hired Oregon craftsmen and artisans, and used Northwest materials to build the house. The final estate included the mansion, a three-car garage, a greenhouse, and the Italianate gate lodge servants’ residence, all situated on 46 acres of land almost 1,000 feet above downtown Portland. At 80 and 68 respectively, Henry and Georgiana moved to their new home. The hard-working couple who had lived in the heart of Portland as it developed from a forest clearing to a bustling business center, now resided high in the hills, with a breathtaking vista of their beloved Portland. It was a warm and gracious house for both the adults and children of the family. Georgiana died in 1918 at the age of 72, and Henry in 1919 at 84. The Pittock family remained in residence at the mansion until 1958, when Peter Gantenbein, a Pittock grandson who had been born in the house, put the estate on the market. The threat of demolition at the hands of land developers, and the extensive damage caused by a storm in 1962, brought concerned citizens together to raise funds to preserve the site. Seeing this popular support, and agreeing that the house had tremendous value as a unique historic resource, the City of Portland purchased the estate in 1964 for $225,000. Fifteen months were spent restoring it. The mansion opened to the public in 1965, and has been a community landmark ever since. A house of historical significance and visual magnificence, the Pittock Mansion today offers us a uniquely personal opportunity to peek into the past, and study our world as it was – from the viewpoint of one Portland family.

Campgrounds and RV Parks near Remote


Remote Outpost RV Park & Lodging

A truely relaxing getaway

The  RV Park was originally developed in 1972 along the Middle Fork of the Coquille River in southwest Oregon.  Because the RV Park has a unique location along the river and in a valley, it has a perfect setting for relaxation and being one with the outdoors.  It offers the  aire of a mountain retreat because of the surrounding terrain and forest while benefitting weather-wise from only being at a 270 foot elevation and within 40 miles of the coast. Over the years the grounds have been groomed, trees planted and creature comforts have been added to align with our customer needs.  Many RV and Motor Coach clubs utilize the park numerous times a year.  Along with the RV sites, we have three "quaint little cabins, just for two, peaceful setting with a river view." A true relaxing getaway.

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Mighway, proud to be part of the TH2 group of companies

Meet some of the other businesses in the TH2 group


Thor Industries

Thor Industries

Parent of brands like Airstream®, Thor Industries owns companies that together represent the world’s largest RV manufacturer.

Road Bear RV

Road Bear RV

From 1980, when they built their first Camper Van, to today, Road Bear has been on an unquestioning quest to 'be the best for the customer'.

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers helps people discover the world around them in an entirely new way by streamlining travel into an engaging and intuitive process.

TH2

TH2

TH2 is a joint venture created by travel giants: Thor Industries, the world’s largest RV manufacturer, and thl, the world’s largest RV rental and sales operator.

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