Visit Point of Rocks, Maryland with Mighway

Rent an RV in Point of Rocks


Point of Rocks is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Frederick County, Maryland, United States. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 1,466. It is named for the striking rock formation on the adjacent Catoctin Mountain, which was formed by the Potomac River cutting through the ridge in a water gap, a typical formation in the Appalachian Mountains. The formation is not visible from the town and can only be seen from boats on the river, or from the southern bank of the river in Virginia.

RV Rental Point of Rocks


Home away from Home
Vehicle Price from
$225 / Night

Home away from Home

Leesburg, Virginia

6 29ft

Forest River berkshire
Vehicle Price from
$250 / Night

Forest River berkshire

Ashburn, Virginia

2 39ft

Places to Visit near Point of Rocks


Horseshoe Casino Baltimore

Horseshoe Casino Baltimore is an urban two-story casino with a 122,000 sq. ft. gaming floor. The multi-million development will feature VLTs, table games and a World Series of Poker room. A 20,000 sq. ft. "Baltimore Marketplace" featuring authentic Charm City food outlets, three premier restaurants, and several bars and lounges will round out the food and beverage offerings.The $400 million development will be located along Russell Street on Baltimore's south side. As an urban casino, it will be designed to maximize connectivity with existing hospitality operators, neighboring professional sports venues M&T Stadium (NFL-Ravens) and Camden Yards (MLB-Orioles) and the city's famed Inner Harbor. Please play responsibly - for help visit mdgamblinghelp.org or call 1-800-522-4700

National Aquarium of Baltimore

We inspire conservation of the world’s aquatic treasures. The National Aquarium protects and preserves this blue planet and all of its animal and habitats through its engaging living collections in our ground-breaking Baltimore attraction and the nation’s first public aquarium in Washington, DC; our science-based education programs and our hands-on experiences in the field from the Chesapeake Bay to Costa Rica; and partnerships and alliances with like-minded organizations around the world. 

J.C. Lore Oyster House

J. C. Lore Oyster House, also known as J. C. Lore and Sons, Inc., Seafood Packing Plant, is located at 14430 Solomons Island Road South, in Solomons, Calvert County, Maryland. It is a large two story, rectangular frame industrial building constructed in 1934 as a seafood packing plant. It replaced a 1922 building that was destroyed by the 1933 Chesapeake Potomac hurricane. It is significant for its historical association with the commercial fisheries of Maryland's Patuxent River region, and architecturally as a substantially unaltered example of an early-20th century seafood packing plant. It has been adapted by the Calvert Marine Museum to house exhibits and many of its original spaces, artifacts, and records have been incorporated into them. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984, and declared a National Historic Landmark in 2001.

Wye Oak State Park

The remains of the Wye Oak supporting its clone The Wye Oak was the largest white oak tree in the United States and the State Tree of Maryland from 1941 until its demise in 2002. Wye Oak State Park preserves the site where the revered tree stood for more than 400 years in the town of Wye Mills, Talbot County, Maryland. The Wye Oak was believed to be over 460 years old at the time of its destruction during a severe thunderstorm on June 6, 2002. It measured in circumference of the trunk at breast height, high, with a crown spread of . It is believed that the acorn that became the oak germinated around the year 1540. The Wye Oak was still bearing a maturing crop of acorns when it was toppled. The Wye Oak drew public attention in 1909, when Maryland State Forester Fred W. Besley made the first official measurement of the tree. Ten years later, in 1919, it was featured in American Forestry magazine as the first tree in the American Forestry Association's "Tree Hall of Fame." The Wye Oak inspired Besley to found the Big Tree Champion Program in 1925; as a result, in 1940 the American Forestry Association named the Wye Oak one of its first National Champion Trees. By the time of its destruction 62 years later, only one other tree named that year remained standing. The tree faced a loss of a large limb in 1956 that sparked concerns, and another limb fell in 1984 that weighed 70,280 lbs. The tree fell during a heavy thunderstorm with high winds on the night of June 6, 2002. The tree's exceptionally long life has been attributed to the efforts of park managers, who applied preventative measures such as fertilizer and insecticide, as well as extensive pruning, cabling, and bracing to the branches.

Campgrounds and RV Parks near Point of Rocks


Calico Rocks Campground

camp near the beautiful Monocacy River

This section contains the beautiful Monocacy Aqueduct, a 500 foot, seven arch, stone bridge used to carry the canal over the Monocacy River. The aqueduct took 4 years to build and was completed in 1833. Next to the tunnel at Paw-Paw (mile 155), is this probably the second most impressive structure on the canal. In the 1970s, the Park service erected temporary exo-skeleton supports around the aqueduct due to damage caused by repeated flooding. In 2005, aqueduct repairs were finally completed, and so the exo-skeleton has been removed. The only other point of interest that you "might" see in this section is the Dickerson power plant (mile 41). In 1992, a training course was built in the power plant's warm water discharge spillway for the US Olympic Kayak Team. You might be able to see it through the chain-link gate at the south side of the complex. Trail conditions are historically poor in the mile or two prior to the town of Point-of-Rocks, Maryland. Expect to navigate around many mud holes in this section. The rest of the path is typically in good shape. Access to the town of Point-of-Rocks is by way of a small, wooden, one-lane bridge over the canal bed. The town is mainly a collection of run down homes. However, there are two stores/deli's about a block off the towpath. This makes the town a good lunch/re-supply stop. Connecting Rides: Here are some short rides that make use of the towpath along this section. Just after the wooden bridge, the C&O Canal passes through the Catoctin Mountain Range. During the canal construction, the B&O Railroad mounted an unsuccessful legal challenge for the narrow right-of-way through this pass. As a result, the railroad was forced to tunnel through the mountain. After the canal failed, the railroad built a second track in the abandoned canal bed. However, the towpath is still intact through the pass.

Visit Calico Rocks Campground

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Thor Industries

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Road Bear RV

Road Bear RV

From 1980, when they built their first Camper Van, to today, Road Bear has been on an unquestioning quest to 'be the best for the customer'.

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers

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TH2

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