Visit Antelope Valley, Los Angeles with Mighway

Rent an RV in Antelope Valley


Antelope Valley is located in northern Los Angeles County, California and the southeast portion of Kern County, California, and constitutes the western tip of the Mojave Desert. It is situated between the Tehachapi and the San Gabriel Mountains. The valley was named for the pronghorns that roamed there until being all but eliminated by bad weather in the 1880s and subsequent hunting for fur. The principal cities in the Antelope Valley are Palmdale and Lancaster.

RV Rental Antelope Valley


2014 Thor Four Winds Majestic
Vehicle Price from
$149 / Night

2014 Thor Four Winds Majestic

La Crescenta, California

5 24ft 10in

Vintage Toyota Dolphin
Vehicle Price from
$119 / Night

Vintage Toyota Dolphin

Los Angeles, California

4 21ft

Thor Hurricane Class A 32 ft motorhome
Vehicle Price from
$225 / Night

Thor Hurricane Class A 32 ft motorhome

Los Angeles, California

7 32ft

Pam
Vehicle Price from
$250 / Night

Pam

Los Angeles, California

6

Brand New 2018 Mecedes Sprinter Chateau
Vehicle Price from
$299 / Night

Brand New 2018 Mecedes Sprinter Chateau

Glendale, California

6 24ft 10in

Thor Chateau 22E
Vehicle Price from
$180 / Night

Thor Chateau 22E

Los Angeles, California

6 24ft

2014 Keystone Outback Bunkhouse
Vehicle Price from
$140 / Night

2014 Keystone Outback Bunkhouse

Lancaster, California

9 36ft

2018 NEWMAR DUTCH STAR
Vehicle Price from
$250 / Night

2018 NEWMAR DUTCH STAR

Los Angeles, California

6 44ft 6in

Places to Visit near Antelope Valley


Musical Road

At first, America’s musical road, located in Lancaster, California, was built as a commercial, but it became a hit with the locals that they decided to keep it, but not until after it drummed up a bit of controversy. The 1/4-mile long, Civic Musical Road was built on September 5, 2008 on Avenue K in Lancaster, California. The stretch of road between 60th Street West and 70th Street West had special grooves that were cute into the asphalt which, when driven over, played the Finale of the William Tell Overture. Just a few weeks after it was built residents complained to the city council about the level of noise and the road was unceremoniously paved over.  When you visit stay on the far left lane of Avenue G, going westbound. It’s preferable if you drive 35 MPH to hear the rhythm of the melody. Some people believe the designers miscalculated the groove spacings, others say you just gotta hit the Honda Civic Musical Highway road going at 35 MPH to hear it best. Then, because people are so silly, more residents started complaining that it wasn’t there anymore, so two weeks later they re-built the road a bit further down on Avenue G between 30th Street West and 40th Street West. The new location was a couple miles away from where people lived and it was named Honda Civic Musical Highway. - Roadtrippers

Western Hotel Museum

The Western Hotel Museum plays host to permanent displays of historical artifacts from the Museum of Art and History’s permanent collection. Most of these objects, ranging from Native American stone tools to old mining equipment, to photographs of well-known Lancaster residents have been donated by members of the public, constituting a preserved record of the history of the area. While specific rooms in the Western Hotel Museum are closed for renovation, exhibitions on view will include: Antelope Valley Mining, the California Missions, Fashions from the Past and Antelope Valley Native Americans. Currently on view are many early Antelope Valley photographs and historical items, as well as mock hotel rooms and an outdoor garden.  Built around 1888, the Western Hotel Museum is downtown Lancaster's oldest surviving structure. As a hotel, it has gone through several names, including the Antelope Valley Hotel, the Gillwyn Hotel, and lastly, the Western Hotel (c. 1895). Its most famous owners were George and Myrtie Webber. Myrtie died in 1978 at the age of 110. Once the Lancaster Hotel, the Western Hotel Museum is the city’s oldest building and the home of several spirits. The sound of footsteps and old records can be heard at random times, and the smell of vanilla and old flowers also has been reported.

Willow Springs International Raceway

Willow Springs International Motorsports Park is located in Willow Springs near Rosamond and Lancaster, California, and is about an hour north of Los Angeles. It is a historic race track, in existence more than fifty years. Construction of the track began in 1952, with the inaugural first race held on November 23, 1953. The main track is a challenging 2.5-mile (4.0 km) long road course that is unchanged from its original 1953 configuration. The interesting elevation changes and high average speeds make it a favorite of many road racing drivers. Willow Springs International Raceway Park also features other racing facilities such as The Streets of Willow (1.8 mile road course), The Horsethief Mile (road course), Willow Springs Speedway (1/4 mile paved oval), Willow Springs Kart Track (a .625-mile, 9-turn paved sprint track), The Playpen (a 1/4-mile paved training track), and the Walt James Stadium (Clay Oval and Paved Oval).

The Cat House

EFBC's Feline Conservation Center, also known as the Cat House, is located in Rosamond, California. Cat lovers of all ages who discover this desert zoo/wildlife museum north of Los Angeles are surprised and amazed at the variety of wild cat species found here. We are dedicated to the protection and preservation of the world's endangered felines.  Children and cat lovers of all ages are fascinated by our cats (and the peacocks). We are open to the public 10 am-4 pm (closed Wednesdays, Christmas day, Thanksgiving day, and the day of Feline Follies). There is an admission charge of $7 general, $6 seniors 60+, $5 age 3-12. To visit, follow the directions on the map, or download and print our PDF information flyer, which includes a map. Be careful using GPS or online maps, 60th Street West does NOT go through from Rosamond Blvd!  Most of the compound is open for visitors to wander around at their own pace. Informative plaques describe the cat species in detail, and docents are available to answer your questions. Unlike a zoo, the FCC has no moats between you and the animals. Visitors can get as close as 5 feet away from these beautiful (but dangerous) cats. Some parts of the compound are not open to the public. For example, we try to keep some of the smaller, high-strung species of cats in quieter areas. And some of the older cages do not have safety fences in front of them - for legal reasons, we are not allowed to have anyone under 18 years old in those areas. That is why only part of the compound is open to general visitors. Until our new tiger cages are complete, the tigers are NOT on display during the day. During Twilight Tours the entire facility is available for viewing.  Wear comfortable walking shoes for your visit. Summer temperatures can reach 120 degrees Farenheit. In the winter, it sometimes snows. The cats are more active in cooler weather, and at Twilight Tours. 

Mighway, proud to be part of the TH2 group of companies

Meet some of the other businesses in the TH2 group


Thor Industries

Thor Industries

Parent of brands like Airstream®, Thor Industries owns companies that together represent the world’s largest RV manufacturer.

Road Bear RV

Road Bear RV

From 1980, when they built their first Camper Van, to today, Road Bear has been on an unquestioning quest to 'be the best for the customer'.

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers helps people discover the world around them in an entirely new way by streamlining travel into an engaging and intuitive process.

TH2

TH2

TH2 is a joint venture created by travel giants: Thor Industries, the world’s largest RV manufacturer, and thl, the world’s largest RV rental and sales operator.

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