Visit Sierra Nevada, California with Mighway

Rent an RV in Sierra Nevada


Sierra-Nevada is perfect for camping, adventuring, or exploring the local culture. California’s mountainous east beckons nature-lovers everywhere, who flock here to experience the wide range of environments and activities available at any time of year. From some of the most famous national parks — Yosemite, Kings Canyon and Sequoia, all offering incredible mountain scenery — to lesser-known gems, like Calaveras Big Trees and Bodie State Parks, there is much to see and do. Without Yosemite, there would not be a national park system. The park, established in 1890, was the first of its kind and with some of the best hiking trails and magnificent views, Yosemite is the place for a memorable vacation. Driving around this region is the best way to see everything it has to offer, and get ready to strap on your hiking boots — getting into the wilderness is often the only way to truly experience Sierra-Nevada. But if you’re looking for a more comfortable experience, there are also plenty of lodges that accommodate visitors of all inclinations. Plan a trip with a rental RV from Mighway, and let the journey unfold.

RV Rental Sierra Nevada


Catalina 313DBDSCK TRAVEL TRAILER
Vehicle Price from
$155 / Night

Catalina 313DBDSCK TRAVEL TRAILER

Clovis, California

6 35ft 11in

BURNING MAN - RENO NEVADA 5th Wheel
Vehicle Price from
$240 / Night

BURNING MAN - RENO NEVADA 5th Wheel

Reno, Nevada

6 35ft

Jayco Envoy 2018
Vehicle Price from
$210 / Night

Jayco Envoy 2018

SA, California

7 33ft

2008 Winnebago Sunova
Vehicle Price from
$250 / Night

2008 Winnebago Sunova

Fresno, California

8 34ft

GREY WOLF 26 DBH
Vehicle Price from
$155 / Night

GREY WOLF 26 DBH

Clovis, California

6 32ft 2in

2016 Pacific Coachworks Sea Breeze 2810
Vehicle Price from
$155 / Night

2016 Pacific Coachworks Sea Breeze 2810

Madera, California

10 28ft

2016 Pacific Coachworks Mighty Lite M20BBS
Vehicle Price from
$135 / Night

2016 Pacific Coachworks Mighty Lite M20BBS

Madera, California

6 20ft

Minnie Winnie
Vehicle Price from
$170 / Night

Minnie Winnie

Dinuba, California

6 31ft 4in

Places to Visit near Sierra Nevada


Yosemite National Park

Not just a great valley, but a shrine to human foresight, the strength of granite, the power of glaciers, the persistence of life, and the tranquility of the High Sierra. First protected in 1864, Yosemite National Park is best known for its waterfalls, but within its nearly 1,200 square miles, you can find deep valleys, grand meadows, ancient giant sequoias, a vast wilderness area, and much more. At first glance, Yosemite’s natural wonders are easy to observe. Sights around the park are iconic in the human experience of national parks. Beyond the rocks, plants, and animals, is a story about people in Yosemite written on that very same landscape. It tells a story of different cultures (sometimes working together, sometimes in violent clashes) creating the place we call Yosemite National Park and defining how we experience it. Yosemite’s rich human history tells a story of conflict, dreams, diversity, hardships, adventures, and preservation of one of the first national parks.

Mono Lake

Mono Lake is a large, shallow saline soda lake in Mono County, California, formed at least 760,000 years ago as a terminal lake in a basin that has no outlet to the ocean. The lack of an outlet causes high levels of salts to accumulate in the lake. These salts also make the lake water alkaline. This desert lake has an unusually productive ecosystem based on brine shrimp that thrive in its waters, and provides critical nesting habitat for two million annual migratory birds that feed on the shrimp. The human history of Mono Lake is associated with its productive ecosystem. The native Kutzadika'a people derived nutrition from the larvae of the alkali flies that live in the lake. When the city of Los Angeles diverted water from flowing into the lake, it lowered the lake level, which imperiled the migratory birds. The Mono Lake Committee formed in response, winning a legal battle that forced Los Angeles to partially restore the lake level. In order to provide water needs for the growing city of Los Angeles, water was diverted from the Owens River into the Los Angeles Aqueduct in 1913. In 1941, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power extended the Los Angeles Aqueduct system farther upriver into the Mono Basin. So much water was diverted that evaporation soon exceeded inflow and the surface level of Mono Lake fell rapidly. By 1982 the lake was reduced to 37,688 acres (15,252 ha) having lost 31 percent of its surface area of 1941. As a result alkaline sands and formerly submerged tufa towers became exposed, and Negit Island became a peninsula, exposing the nests of sea gulls to predators (such as coyotes), and forcing the sea gull colony to abandon this site. Currently, Mono Lake is in a geologically active area at the north end of the Mono–Inyo Craters volcanic chain and is close to Long Valley Caldera. Volcanic activity continues in the Mono Lake vicinity: the most recent eruption occurred 350 years ago, resulting in the formation of Paoha Island. Panum Crater (on the south shore of the lake) is an excellent example of a combined rhyolite dome and cinder cone. he Diver, a photo taken by Storm Thorgerson for Pink Floyd's album Wish You Were Here (1975), features what appears to be a man diving into a lake, creating no ripples. The photo was taken at Mono Lake, and the tufa towers are a prominent part of the landscape. The effect was actually created when the diver performed a handstand underwater until the ripples dissipated. The general appearance of the lake and surrounding mountains circa 1973 can also be seen in the Clint Eastwood film High Plains Drifter.

Travertine Hot Springs

Travertine Hot Spring lies on California State Park land just south of the town of Bridgeport along Route 395. It is one of the easiest hot springs to get to and features a stunning view of the Sierras while you bathe. All types of people visit Travertine, including the nearby park rangers, campers, families, couples, and single travelers. Limited camping space is available on the short dirt road leading to the hot springs, but is not allowed in the immediate area of the pools. Directions - Take Route 395 south of Bridgeport half a mile. Turn left at Jack Sawyer Road, just before the Ranger Station. Follow Jack Sawyer Road approximately one mile. Road may close or be difficult to travel on with snow.   

Kings Canyon National Park

A testament to nature's size, beauty, and diversity - huge mountains, rugged foothills, deep canyons, vast caverns, and the world's largest trees. Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks lie side by side in the southern Sierra Nevada, east of the San Joaquin Valley. Visitor activities vary by season and elevation (1,370 to 14,494 feet). The unusual diversity of climates and ecosystems in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks led to its designation as an International Biosphere Reserve. There are 580 reserves in 114 countries that hold this honor world-wide. Humans have traveled or lived in the Southern Sierra for at least 6-7,000 years. In the higher mountains, and also down into the western foothills, lived hunters and gatherers remembered today as the Monache or Western Mono. West of the Monache in the lowest foothills and also across the expanses of the Great Central Valley were a second group, the Yokuts. In the late 1700s and early 1800s, Spanish agents began exploring the edge of the Sierra Nevada Range. Within 50 years or so, trappers, sheepherders, miners, and loggers poured into the Sierra seeking to use the mountains' resources. By the end of the 19th century, San Joaquin Valley communities increasingly looked to the Sierra for water and recreation. In the struggle between all these competing interests, two national parks were born that became known as Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Today, the parks together protect well over 500 Native American archeological sites and over 100 historic sites. The number of recorded sites grows each year because of project surveys.

Campgrounds and RV Parks near Sierra Nevada


Half Dome Village

A good bed and clean napkin with every meal

In 1899, David and Jennie Curry opened a tented camp so that visitors could enjoy the beauty of Yosemite for a modest price. They advertised "a good bed and clean napkin with every meal" for just $2 a day. Today, Curry Village®, otherwise known around Yosemite as Camp Curry, still offers park visitors comfortable, inexpensive lodging right in the shadow of spectacular Glacier Point and Half Dome. Tucked right in the heart of Yosemite, below the towering majesty of Half Dome and Glacier Point, Curry Village cabins offer guests a unique and magnificent place to stay. Scattered throughout the village, guests will find 46 comfortable Yosemite cabins with private baths, plus 18 standard motel rooms, and 319 canvas tent cabins. In addition, there are 14 cabins with centrally located bath houses. 

Visit Half Dome Village

Upper Pines Campground

Camping in the pines...

Each campsite contains a fire ring, picnic table, and food locker [33"(D)x45"(W)x18"(H)] (some sites have larger lockers), and is near a bathroom with potable water and flushing toilets. Campsites 21, 27, and 42 are suitable for wheelchairs. Picnic tables at these sites have extended tops. These campsites are limited to people with disabilities.

Visit Upper Pines Campground

Mighway, proud to be part of the TH2 group of companies

Meet some of the other businesses in the TH2 group


Thor Industries

Thor Industries

Parent of brands like Airstream®, Thor Industries owns companies that together represent the world’s largest RV manufacturer.

Road Bear RV

Road Bear RV

From 1980, when they built their first Camper Van, to today, Road Bear has been on an unquestioning quest to 'be the best for the customer'.

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers helps people discover the world around them in an entirely new way by streamlining travel into an engaging and intuitive process.

TH2

TH2

TH2 is a joint venture created by travel giants: Thor Industries, the world’s largest RV manufacturer, and thl, the world’s largest RV rental and sales operator.