Visit Deserts of California with Mighway

Rent an RV in Deserts of California


If you want to see everything the California landscape has to offer, then the deserts is where your next vacation should be. You’ll easily be able to fill every moment with activities ranging from relaxing to adventure. Enjoy the nature and wildlife on one of the many tours that will take you through dusty dirt trails to sprawling mountains. The natural beauty lures millions of outdoor enthusiasts every year to experience desert life at its fullest. Once you’re done exploring national parks, you can wind down in one of the resorts or spas for some rest and relaxation. The Two Bunch Palms spa is highly recommended for their natural springs and outdoor massages. Shopping is a must during any vacation, and you’ll have plenty of opportunity with El Paseo Shopping. Filled with high end retailers, you can pick up something nice for yourself, then enjoy some delicious California cuisine at one of the many restaurants. Add some culture to your trip with a visit to the Palm Springs Art Museum, housing famous sculptures and paintings from over the years. If you’re feeling more adventurous, take an excursion to the San Andreas Fault to do some four wheeling through the canyons. Plan a trip with Mighway, and let the journey unfold!

RV Rental Deserts of California


Cabover Style C 27-29ft - Santa Fe V2
Vehicle Price from
$177.4 / Night

Cabover Style C 27-29ft - Santa Fe V2

Santa Fe Springs, California

6 28ft

Cabover Style C22 RV - Las Vegas/Henderson V4
Vehicle Price from
$103.7 / Night

Cabover Style C22 RV - Las Vegas/Henderson V4

Las Vegas, Nevada

5 6ft 7in

Cabover Style C 23-25ft RV - Las Vegas V1
Vehicle Price from
$110.4 / Night

Cabover Style C 23-25ft RV - Las Vegas V1

Las Vegas, Nevada

5 25ft

Cabover Style C 23-25ft RV - San Diego, Santee V1
Vehicle Price from
$164.1 / Night

Cabover Style C 23-25ft RV - San Diego, Santee V1

Santee, California

5 25ft

Taos
Vehicle Price from
$225 / Night

Taos

Costa Mesa, California

4

Grey Wolf Bunk House DELIVERED FULLY STOCKED Sleeps 7
Vehicle Price from
$200 / Night

Grey Wolf Bunk House DELIVERED FULLY STOCKED Sleeps 7

Anaheim, California

6 31ft 7in

Jayco Seneca 35'
Vehicle Price from
$275 / Night

Jayco Seneca 35'

Banning, California

8

Luxury Fleetwood - 3 slide outs!
Vehicle Price from
$359 / Night

Luxury Fleetwood - 3 slide outs!

Los Angeles, California

7

Places to Visit near Deserts of California


Death Valley National Park

Death Valley is the largest U.S. National Park outside Alaska at 3.4 million acres. Nearly 1000 miles of paved and dirt roads provide access to locations both popular and remote. Even so, 91% of the park is protected as officially designated Wilderness. That wild country includes low valley floors crusted with barren salt flats, rugged mountains rising as much as 11,000 feet, deep and winding canyons, rolling sand dunes, and spring-fed oases. Whether you have an afternoon or a week, careful planning will help make your visit safe and enjoyable. The Furnace Creek Visitor Center is the main visitor information source for the park. It is open Daily from 8-5 and there is a fully staffed information desk with information on all aspects of the park and its operation. GPS Navigation to sites to remote locations like Death Valley are notoriously unreliable. The map is to the visitor center In this below-sea-level basin, steady drought and record summer heat make Death Valley a land of extremes. Yet, each extreme has a striking contrast. Towering peaks are frosted with winter snow. Rare rainstorms bring vast fields of wildflowers. Lush oases harbor tiny fish and refuge for wildlife and humans. Despite its morbid name, a great diversity of life survives in Death Valley. Death Valley: The name is forbidding and gloomy. Yet here you can find colorful badlands, snow-covered peaks, beautiful sand dunes, rugged canyons, the driest and lowest spot in North America, and the hottest in the world. On any given summer day, the valley floor shimmers silently in the heat. For five months of the year unmerciful heat dominates the scene, and for the next seven the heat releases its grip only slightly. Rain rarely gets past the guardian mountains, but the little rain that does fall is the life force of the wildflowers that transform the desert into a vast garden. Despite the harshness and severity of the environment, more than 1000 kinds of plants live within the park. Those on the valley floor have adapted to a desert life by a variety of means. Some have roots that go down 10 times the height of a person. Some plants have a root system that lies just below the surface but extends out in all directions. Others have leaves and stems that allow very little evaporation and loss of life giving water.

Joshua Tree National Park

Joshua Tree National Park is immense, nearly 800,000 acres, and infinitely variable. It can seem unwelcoming, even brutal during the heat of summer when, in fact, it is delicate and extremely fragile. This is a land shaped by strong winds, sudden torrents of rain, and climatic extremes. Rainfall is sparse and unpredictable. Streambeds are usually dry and waterholes are few. Viewed in summer, this land may appear defeated and dead, but within this parched environment are intricate living systems waiting for the opportune moment to reproduce. The individuals, both plant and animal, that inhabit the park are not individualists. They depend on their entire ecosystem for survival. Two deserts, two large ecosystems primarily determined by elevation, come together in the park. Few areas more vividly illustrate the contrast between “high” and “low” desert. Below 3,000 feet (910 m), the Colorado Desert (part of the Sonoran Desert), occupying the eastern half of the park, is dominated by the abundant creosote bush. Adding interest to this arid land are small stands of spidery ocotillo and cholla cactus.The higher, slightly cooler, and wetter Mojave Desert is the special habitat of the undisciplined Joshua tree, extensive stands of which occur throughout the western half of the park. According to legend, Mormon pioneers considered the limbs of the Joshua trees to resemble the upstretched arms of Joshua leading them to the promised land. Others were not as visionary. Early explorer John Fremont described them as “…the most repulsive tree in the vegetable Kingdom.”

Badwater Basin

The salt flats in Badwater Basin cover nearly 200 square miles, among the largest protected salt flats in the world. Salt flats are too harsh for most plants and animals to survive, yet are quite fragile. Delicate crystals are easily crushed and the relatively thin upper crust of salt can break through to the mud layer below, leaving tire tracks and even footprints. For this reason, vehicles are prohibited off established roads in Death Valley.

Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes

These dunes are the best known and easiest to visit in the national park. Located in central Death Valley near Stovepipe Wells, access is from Hwy. 190 or from the unpaved Sand Dunes Road. Although the highest dune rises only about 100 feet, the dunes actually cover a vast area. This dune field includes three types of dunes: crescent, linear, and star shaped. Polygon-cracked clay of an ancient lakebed forms the floor. Mesquite trees have created large hummocks that provide stable habitats for wildlife. The Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes are at the northern end of the valley floor and are nearly surrounded by mountains on all sides. Due to their easy access from the road and the overall proximity of Death Valley to Hollywood, these dunes have been used to film sand dune scenes for several movies including films in the Star Wars series. The largest dune is called Star Dune and is relatively stable and stationary because it is at a point where the various winds that shape the dunes converge. The depth of the sand at its crest is 130–140 feet (40–43 m) but this is small compared to other dunes in the area that have sand depths of up to 600–700 feet (180–210 m) deep. The primary source of the dune sands is probably the Cottonwood Mountains which lie to the north and northwest. The tiny grains of quartz and feldspar that form the sinuous sculptures that make up this dune field began as much larger pieces of solid rock. In between many of the dunes are stands of creosote bush and some mesquite on the sand and on dried mud, which used to cover this part of the valley before the dunes intruded (mesquite was the dominant plant here before the sand dunes but creosote does much better in the sand dune conditions).

Campgrounds and RV Parks near Deserts of California


Death Valley National Park

Hottest, Driest, and Lowest National Park

Death Valley is the largest U.S. National Park outside Alaska at 3.4 million acres. Nearly 1000 miles of paved and dirt roads provide access to locations both popular and remote. Even so, 91% of the park is protected as officially designated Wilderness. That wild country includes low valley floors crusted with barren salt flats, rugged mountains rising as much as 11,000 feet, deep and winding canyons, rolling sand dunes, and spring-fed oases. Whether you have an afternoon or a week, careful planning will help make your visit safe and enjoyable. The Furnace Creek Visitor Center is the main visitor information source for the park. It is open Daily from 8-5 and there is a fully staffed information desk with information on all aspects of the park and its operation. GPS Navigation to sites to remote locations like Death Valley are notoriously unreliable. The map is to the visitor center In this below-sea-level basin, steady drought and record summer heat make Death Valley a land of extremes. Yet, each extreme has a striking contrast. Towering peaks are frosted with winter snow. Rare rainstorms bring vast fields of wildflowers. Lush oases harbor tiny fish and refuge for wildlife and humans. Despite its morbid name, a great diversity of life survives in Death Valley. Death Valley: The name is forbidding and gloomy. Yet here you can find colorful badlands, snow-covered peaks, beautiful sand dunes, rugged canyons, the driest and lowest spot in North America, and the hottest in the world. On any given summer day, the valley floor shimmers silently in the heat. For five months of the year unmerciful heat dominates the scene, and for the next seven the heat releases its grip only slightly. Rain rarely gets past the guardian mountains, but the little rain that does fall is the life force of the wildflowers that transform the desert into a vast garden. Despite the harshness and severity of the environment, more than 1000 kinds of plants live within the park. Those on the valley floor have adapted to a desert life by a variety of means. Some have roots that go down 10 times the height of a person. Some plants have a root system that lies just below the surface but extends out in all directions. Others have leaves and stems that allow very little evaporation and loss of life giving water.

Visit Death Valley National Park

Furnace Creek Campground

a good base camp for exploring Death Valley

This is a well-developed national park site that provides a good base camp for exploring Death Valley, especially for newcomers and families. The nearby visitors center includes Death Valley Museum and offers maps and suggestions for hikes and drives in this unique wildland. This camp offers shady sites, a rarity in Death Valley, but they are packed close together and noise may be a factor when the campground is full. It’s open all year, but keep in mind that the daytime summer temperatures commonly exceed 120°F, making this area virtually uninhabitable in the summer. The elevation is 190 feet below sea level. There are 136 sites for tents or RVs up to 35 feet (no hookups), and two group sites for up to 10 vehicles and 40 people each. Picnic tables and fire rings are provided. Drinking water, flush toilets, dump station, and evening ranger programs are available. Campfires are not permitted during the summer. Some facilities are wheelchair-accessible. Leashed pets are permitted at campsites only.

Visit Furnace Creek Campground

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Meet some of the other businesses in the TH2 group


Thor Industries

Thor Industries

Parent of brands like Airstream®, Thor Industries owns companies that together represent the world’s largest RV manufacturer.

Road Bear RV

Road Bear RV

From 1980, when they built their first Camper Van, to today, Road Bear has been on an unquestioning quest to 'be the best for the customer'.

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers helps people discover the world around them in an entirely new way by streamlining travel into an engaging and intuitive process.

TH2

TH2

TH2 is a joint venture created by travel giants: Thor Industries, the world’s largest RV manufacturer, and thl, the world’s largest RV rental and sales operator.