Visit Deserts of California with Mighway

Rent an RV in Deserts of California


If you want to see everything the California landscape has to offer, then the deserts is where your next vacation should be. You’ll easily be able to fill every moment with activities ranging from relaxing to adventure. Enjoy the nature and wildlife on one of the many tours that will take you through dusty dirt trails to sprawling mountains. The natural beauty lures millions of outdoor enthusiasts every year to experience desert life at its fullest. Once you’re done exploring national parks, you can wind down in one of the resorts or spas for some rest and relaxation. The Two Bunch Palms spa is highly recommended for their natural springs and outdoor massages. Shopping is a must during any vacation, and you’ll have plenty of opportunity with El Paseo Shopping. Filled with high end retailers, you can pick up something nice for yourself, then enjoy some delicious California cuisine at one of the many restaurants. Add some culture to your trip with a visit to the Palm Springs Art Museum, housing famous sculptures and paintings from over the years. If you’re feeling more adventurous, take an excursion to the San Andreas Fault to do some four wheeling through the canyons. Plan a trip with Mighway, and let the journey unfold!

RV Rental Deserts of California


Expedition Class A - Thor Hurricane A
Vehicle Price from
$177 / Night

Expedition Class A - Thor Hurricane A

Calabasas, California

7 32ft

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Cabover Style C 31-32ft - Corona (Norco)
Vehicle Price from
$85 / Night

Cabover Style C 31-32ft - Corona (Norco)

Norco, California

6 32ft

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Expedition Class B - Thor Chateau
Vehicle Price from
$261 / Night

Expedition Class B - Thor Chateau

Calabasas, California

4 25ft 3in

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The Dolphin
Vehicle Price from
$189 / Night

The Dolphin

Los Angeles, California

6

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SLIDEOUT AF34 FAMILY SLEEPER RV - LA/Santa Fe Springs V4
Vehicle Price from
$223 / Night

SLIDEOUT AF34 FAMILY SLEEPER RV - LA/Santa Fe Springs V4

Santa Fe Springs, California

6 35ft

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Sahara RV - 14 Keystone Hideout 29
Vehicle Price from
$150 / Night

Sahara RV - 14 Keystone Hideout 29

Las Vegas, Nevada

6 29ft

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Sahara RV - '12 Freelander 29' 8B CLASS C
Vehicle Price from
$260 / Night

Sahara RV - '12 Freelander 29' 8B CLASS C

Las Vegas, Nevada

8 29ft

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SLIDEOUT AF34 FAMILY SLEEPER RV - Las Vegas
Vehicle Price from
$232.55 / Night

SLIDEOUT AF34 FAMILY SLEEPER RV - Las Vegas

Las Vegas, Nevada

6 35ft

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Places to Visit near Deserts of California


Dante's View

Spectacular view from an overlook just a mile or two away from Badwater, but 4000 feet taller. The road to Dante's View is a bit long, but the view is worth it. If you are towing a trailer, a parking lot is provided for you to leave your trailer behind before ascending the most difficult part of the road to Dante's View.

Joshua Tree National Park

Joshua Tree National Park is immense, nearly 800,000 acres, and infinitely variable. It can seem unwelcoming, even brutal during the heat of summer when, in fact, it is delicate and extremely fragile. This is a land shaped by strong winds, sudden torrents of rain, and climatic extremes. Rainfall is sparse and unpredictable. Streambeds are usually dry and waterholes are few. Viewed in summer, this land may appear defeated and dead, but within this parched environment are intricate living systems waiting for the opportune moment to reproduce. The individuals, both plant and animal, that inhabit the park are not individualists. They depend on their entire ecosystem for survival. Two deserts, two large ecosystems primarily determined by elevation, come together in the park. Few areas more vividly illustrate the contrast between “high” and “low” desert. Below 3,000 feet (910 m), the Colorado Desert (part of the Sonoran Desert), occupying the eastern half of the park, is dominated by the abundant creosote bush. Adding interest to this arid land are small stands of spidery ocotillo and cholla cactus.The higher, slightly cooler, and wetter Mojave Desert is the special habitat of the undisciplined Joshua tree, extensive stands of which occur throughout the western half of the park. According to legend, Mormon pioneers considered the limbs of the Joshua trees to resemble the upstretched arms of Joshua leading them to the promised land. Others were not as visionary. Early explorer John Fremont described them as “…the most repulsive tree in the vegetable Kingdom.”

Zabriskie Point

Zabriskie Point is a part of Amargosa Range located in east of Death Valley in Death Valley National Park in the United States noted for its erosional landscape. It is composed of sediments from Furnace Creek Lake, which dried up 5 million years ago—long before Death Valley came into existence. Millions of years prior to the actual sinking and widening of Death Valley and the existence of Lake Manly (see Geology of the Death Valley area), another lake covered a large portion of Death Valley including the area around Zabriskie Point. This ancient lake began forming approximately nine million years ago. During several million years of the lake's existence, sediments were collecting at the bottom in the form of saline muds, gravels from nearby mountains, and ashfalls from the then-active Black Mountain volcanic field. These sediments combined to form what we today call the Furnace Creek Formation. The climate along Furnace Creek Lake was dry, but not nearly as dry as in the present. Camels, mastodons, horses, carnivores, and birds left tracks in the lakeshore muds, along with fossilized grass and reeds. Borates, which made up a large portion of Death Valley's historical past were concentrated in the lakebeds from hot spring waters and alteration of rhyolite in the nearby volcanic field. Weathering and alteration by thermal waters are also responsible for the variety of colors represented there. Regional mountains building to the west influenced the climate to become more and more arid, causing the lake to dry up, and creating a dry lake. Subsequent widening and sinking of Death Valley and the additional uplift of today's Black Mountains tilted the area. This provided the necessary relief to accomplish the erosion that produced the badlands we see today. The dark-colored material capping the badland ridges (to the left in the panoramic photograph) is lava from eruptions that occurred three to five million years ago. This hard lava cap has retarded erosion in many places and possibly explains why Manly Beacon, the high outcrop to the right, is much higher than other portion of the badlands. Manly Beacon was named in honor of William L. Manly, who along with John Rogers, guided members of the ill-fated Forty-niners out of Death Valley during the gold rush of 1849.

Palm Springs Art Museum

Located in the heart of downtown Palm Springs, the Palm Springs Art Museum features a sophisticated collection of art, loaned or donated by the area's affluent residents. The museum has an art collection that rivals urban metropolitan museums, and includes works from Marc Chagall, Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Donald Judd, Louise Bourgeois, Alexander Calder, Henry Moore, Robert Rauschenberg, Antony Gormley and Ansel Adams. Spread over the 150,000 square feet, the museum boasts major collections of modern and contemporary art, glass, photography, architecture and design and Native American and Western art. It has two outdoor sculpture gardens, a café featuring American and Continental cuisine, and a museum store that includes one-of-a-kind gifts and art-related merchandise. The museum is open every day except Mondays and major holidays, and is always 75 degrees, providing a welcome respite from the Palm Springs summer triple-digit temperatures. It features free admission every Thursday evening from 4-8 p.m. and every second Sunday of each month. Museum History .

Campgrounds and RV Parks near Deserts of California


Death Valley National Park

Hottest, Driest, and Lowest National Park

Death Valley is the largest U.S. National Park outside Alaska at 3.4 million acres. Nearly 1000 miles of paved and dirt roads provide access to locations both popular and remote. Even so, 91% of the park is protected as officially designated Wilderness. That wild country includes low valley floors crusted with barren salt flats, rugged mountains rising as much as 11,000 feet, deep and winding canyons, rolling sand dunes, and spring-fed oases. Whether you have an afternoon or a week, careful planning will help make your visit safe and enjoyable. The Furnace Creek Visitor Center is the main visitor information source for the park. It is open Daily from 8-5 and there is a fully staffed information desk with information on all aspects of the park and its operation. GPS Navigation to sites to remote locations like Death Valley are notoriously unreliable. The map is to the visitor center In this below-sea-level basin, steady drought and record summer heat make Death Valley a land of extremes. Yet, each extreme has a striking contrast. Towering peaks are frosted with winter snow. Rare rainstorms bring vast fields of wildflowers. Lush oases harbor tiny fish and refuge for wildlife and humans. Despite its morbid name, a great diversity of life survives in Death Valley. Death Valley: The name is forbidding and gloomy. Yet here you can find colorful badlands, snow-covered peaks, beautiful sand dunes, rugged canyons, the driest and lowest spot in North America, and the hottest in the world. On any given summer day, the valley floor shimmers silently in the heat. For five months of the year unmerciful heat dominates the scene, and for the next seven the heat releases its grip only slightly. Rain rarely gets past the guardian mountains, but the little rain that does fall is the life force of the wildflowers that transform the desert into a vast garden. Despite the harshness and severity of the environment, more than 1000 kinds of plants live within the park. Those on the valley floor have adapted to a desert life by a variety of means. Some have roots that go down 10 times the height of a person. Some plants have a root system that lies just below the surface but extends out in all directions. Others have leaves and stems that allow very little evaporation and loss of life giving water.

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Slab City

Off the Grid Living

Formerly the U.S. Marine Corp training base called Camp Dunlap used in World War II. It was closed, buildings were deconstructed, and abandoned years ago. The ownership of the land reverted from the military back to the State of California and has no current plans of being used.All the buildings were deconstructed and the cement slabs upon which they stood stay, thus “Slab City”. It is now home to many winter travelers, retirees, and some permanent residents who stay the summer as well. (Like us!).There are no fees to camp here. Campsite parking is on a first come/first serve basis. There is no water, sewer, trash pick-up, nor electricity. This is Boondocking territory. This is where people experiment living Off The GridPeople tend to camp in groups of like-minded people and similar interests such as US Citizens, Canadians, Single RV camping clubs, and even Hobos or young train hoppers.

Visit Slab City

Mighway, proud to be part of the TH2 group of companies

Meet some of the other businesses in the TH2 group


Thor Industries

Thor Industries

Parent of brands like Airstream®, Thor Industries owns companies that together represent the world’s largest RV manufacturer.

Road Bear RV

Road Bear RV

From 1980, when they built their first Camper Van, to today, Road Bear has been on an unquestioning quest to 'be the best for the customer'.

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers

Roadtrippers helps people discover the world around them in an entirely new way by streamlining travel into an engaging and intuitive process.

TH2

TH2

TH2 is a joint venture created by travel giants: Thor Industries, the world’s largest RV manufacturer, and thl, the world’s largest RV rental and sales operator.